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conehead
I just had to make one.

I went to wrap my first rod two weeks ago and realized the cardboard box and phone book just was not going to cut it. I hit the garage and four hours later here is what I came up with (sorry guys, I stole, I mean borrowed all the ideas form the rod wrappers you all have posted).

I like the idea of having a guide for my thread so that it can be seen as it winds from the top.

user posted image

I used a crackle paint and it makes the wrapper look like it was made a 100 years ago. It goes well with my tying room. I also wanted something bright, (I have old eyes) the more light the better.

I had a problem with the felt I used for the rod to ride in. Fibers kept sticking to the masking tape when it was near and also would stick to the thread and guides when they were close by. I think Iíll reline the cradles with craft foam.

user posted image

Such a simplistic piece of equipment, but Dude, does it make quick work of wrapping those guides. I screwed a couple of wood screws near the rod holders so the rubber bands would not keep sliding up and off.

user posted image

The only problem I had were with the wing nuts. I could not find the type that had an anti-vibration ring built in. I did use nylon, but after a while they began to loosen the thread tension even with the springs holding tension. All in all it worked extremely well. Thanks guys for all your ideas

Conehead
SmallieHunter
Looks great man, I like it. I am gonna try to build one before my next rod project but I'm not all that skilled with power tools so I'm sure it will be a disaster.

Using the crackle paint was a cool idea headbang.gif
conehead
Will,

Thanks for the comment, but man if you can make this site work, you can make your own wrapper,

It was not all that difficult.

I have a table saw and that made it easy. In its former life it was a store bought shelf about 6"wide. It is really particle board with that woodgrain paper laminated to it.

Glue would not stick to the original finish, so I had to sand the paper off or throw in a few drywall screws to hold it. I think I spent about $6 for the hardware. One of the guys used a peice of spring steel and an old tip top for his thread guide. I ended up using a coat hanger

It works, but if I do a few more rods I can see the coat hanger getting a few wear spots and shreading the thread, I will order a tiptop whith my next rod kit. what am I talking about (next rod kit). I am addicted.

Na, I can quit anytime I want, I just don't want to.

Conehead,
SmallieHunter
I'm defiently gonna give it a shot, but if it doesn't have a keyboard, I'm lost laugh.gif
conehead
Just thinking,

Give me super moderator's powers, and I just might drop ship mine to you.

The first thing I would do is give Skunked his name back.

LOL LOL

Conehead
steeldrifter
Looks real good conehead.I'm about to start on building my own wrapper after this weekend.
Mark Shamburg
Conehead,

Try turning the thread spools around so spool spins the other direction. That way as the spool turns it will try to tighten the nut, but the tension from the spring should keep it put.

If that doesn work I've been using a skateboard ball bearing.

Mark
OSD
For all the help he has given me on getting set up with tools and building me a planning form for bamboo fly rod making, I am also making a wrapping jig for my good friend Toddfather.

I is almost complete except for the hardware

user posted image

user posted image
rovercat
SmallieHunter
I happen to have the necessary power tools to do most things but just to show some folks they are not needed I built a drying motor and a 3 ft rod wrapper with all hand tools. Popler cut to size can be purchesed at some hardwre and craft stores. I but mine at Home Depot. For tool I used a $12.95 miter box from Wal-Mart a cheep back saw, drill and a screw driver. Somewhere in this beast I have a drawing for the dryer and part of one for thr wrapper. if I remember I will re load my CAD Program and post them.
steeldrifter
That's a nice looking wrapper Bob headbang.gif


Now you guys got me all geeked to start building mine before the weekend laugh.gif

Where do you get the felt with the sticky back?
Mark Shamburg
Steeldrifter,

I've seen sticky back felt at hoby stores like Michaels and fabric stores like Joanns. But it's about 10 times more expensive as the non sticky kind. A little double stick tape and regular felt is all you need.

Although, if you can find some of the sticky back foam strips for doors that would probably work prety well too.

Mark
steeldrifter
Thanks Mark, I'll take a run over to Micheals next week and see what they have.
conehead
Mark,

Great idea abouut reversing the thread, I'll have to give it a try. One of the posts on rod wrappers used a nylon wing nut (think it was called dareen or somehting like that) that does not unwind. Wouldn't the skateboard bearing
just continue to make the thread slip without tension?


OSD,

Is that cedar wood. I like the look of real wood, especially unusual colors and grain patterns. Also love the way cedar smells (if that is cedar). I used paint because of the cheap material (particle board) I used to make it.


Steeldrifter.

I just used reular felt from the local craft store and a little spray adhisive. But like I said, if you have a masking tape wrap (even painters tape) a few felt fibers will stick to the rod. after one or two revelotions, the fibers will bind and pretty soon the rod does not turn.

This even happened when one of the guide wraps got close to the felt. Like I said, I think I'm going to replace the felt with craft foam.

Conehead
Richstick
another option besides felt is to get some sticky backed velcro strips. I got mine at the hardware store, they come with the hook (prickly) piece and loop(soft) piece mounted on a backing next to each other. Cut off the hook piece (then toss it) and use the loop piece to line your wrapper cradles. At the store I got it at, you can buy it by the foot. I think 2 feet or so did my wrapper and dryer. The glue on the back of them is great, very strong. Works great! thumbup.gif
Mark Shamburg
Conehead,

Here's the set up I use with the bearing.


Large Washer - Thread Spool - Large Washer - Bearing - Small Washer - Spring - Small Washer - Wing Nut.

The bearing allows you to put pressure on the spool of thread without causing the nut to loosen.

I looked for the locking wing nuts as well but I haven't found them locally. I'm sure www.mcmaster.com sells them though.

Mark
conehead
Thanks for the info.

Just by pooling ideas and our brains together, we could crank out the ultimate rod wrappers.

Thanks for the velcro idea. I have about 2 feet of it at home.

Thanks,
Conehead
Carlin
Definitely very nice wrappers guys! clapping.gif I'm sure they'll work as good as they look.

Great idea with the velcro Richstick, but how about saving a piece of the hook part and use it as a hold down?
OSD
QUOTE
s that cedar wood. I like the look of real wood, especially unusual colors and grain patterns. Also love the way cedar smells (if that is cedar). I used paint because of the cheap material (particle board) I used to make it.


Yes it's Red Cedar and white Oak.

Bob
TODDFATHER
OSD,

I guess thanks are in order for the wrapping jig although I haven't the faintest idea how to use it! I've wrapped all my rods by hand spinning the shaft between my fingers. I'm sure I'm missing out on something but don't know how you'd control that device. I think a demonstration will likely be in order fo I don't get in too much trouble with it. Anyhow, thanks for the thoughtfulness, and the effort in making it: I truly appreciate it! I haven't been online too much lately for a number of reasons. hopefully that will end soon and I'll have a little more time for playing with rodbuilding.


Thanks again Bob!




Toddfather
OSD
It' the least I can do for all the help that you have given me in this cane rod building endeavor
I think once you have tried the wrapping jig you will wonder why you ever wrapped a rod with out one (It makes it much easier)


Bob
Carlin
Hey Toddfather,

Good to see you on the site! I hope you can find time to visit more often. smile.gif

Bob is right. You'll be amazed at how easy wrapping is with the right tools - much like anything. It'll speed things up considerably, make it easier and result in a better finished product.
rhossack
QUOTE (conehead @ May 24 2005, 01:34 AM)
I just had to make one.

I went to wrap my first rod two weeks ago and realized the cardboard box and phone book just was not going to cut it.  I hit the garage and four hours later here is what I came up with (sorry guys, I stole, I mean borrowed all the ideas form the rod wrappers you all have posted).

I like the idea of having a guide for my thread so that it can be seen as it winds from the top.

user posted image

I used a crackle paint and it makes the wrapper look like it was made a 100 years ago.  It goes well with my tying room.  I also wanted something bright, (I have old eyes) the more light the better.

I had a problem with the felt I used for the rod to ride in.  Fibers kept sticking to the masking tape when it was near and also would stick to the thread and guides when they were close by.  I think Iíll reline the cradles with craft foam.

user posted image

Such a simplistic piece of equipment, but Dude, does it make quick work of wrapping those guides.  I screwed a couple of wood screws near the rod holders so the rubber bands would not keep sliding up and off.

user posted image

The only problem I had were with the wing nuts.  I could not find the type that had an anti-vibration ring built in.  I did use nylon, but after a while they began to loosen the thread tension even with the springs holding tension.  All in all it worked extremely well.  Thanks guys for all your ideas

Conehead

QUOTE
I had a problem with the felt I used for the rod to ride in. Fibers kept sticking to the masking tape when it was near and also would stick to the thread and guides when they were close by. I think Iíll reline the cradles with craft foam.


Nice, very nice.

If you haven't done the craft foam try using a plastic milk bottle. After getting one of my nice wet wraps touching the felt in my upright I decided that wasn't going to work so I cut a couple of strips from the milk bottle and glued them to the
uprights with contact cement.

I really like the look of that thread guide ... will have to look how I can incorporate
that on my wrapper ...
mi's holy water
here is a pic of one i just built dunno.gif if it's 4sale or not though because i have one already that works great hope this pic does justice to the wraper. it took about 4 hours to build any ways here it is



user posted image







good luck and tight lines






~HW~
conehead
Rhossack,

Thanks for the Milk bottle plastic tip. I plan on starting a few rods this winter and have not pulled off the felt yet. I would guess that plastic would act like a nylon bushing.

Know what youy mean by the felt and wet wraps (like a tar and feather event)

Thanks,
Conehead
mhackney
Nice wrappers! I played around with the wingnut/spring tensioner for a few months and then came across these: http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/template...0036&hasJS=true

at Cabelas. For $4.95 they are a steal. I grabbed 2 so I can wrap with 2 colors. They work great and you will always have consistent tension.

Now for a question, what did you use for your arm that arcs up over the rod?

cheers,
Michael
Rock Hopper
Don't know how I've missed this thread for so long ............. dunno.gif

Here are a couple shots that sorta show the wrapper I am currently using. Not the best pics for showing off the wrapper, just the best I currently have. Consist of a couple 6' long pieces of aluminum scrap, 3/4" MDF and roller wheels from a sliding glass shower door. Nothing really fancy, but it is a joy to wrap on! banana.gif

user posted image user posted image
mhackney
That looks great Rock Hopper! I have tons of that aluminum angle lying around, why didn't I think of that. What I like about yours is the rod hold downs. I bet that works well for wrapping the tip top as well as the last guide or 2.

cheers,
Michael
Magnus H
After seen all these nice looking wrappers, I have to share a picture of my first.

I was going to build my first rod. banana.gif

I was sitting in a couch at home with the blank, guides and thread in my hands and thinking "How am I going to get out of this whitout looking like the horses ass?" dunno.gif

A quick session with [insert search engine of your choice, cos I can't remember] gave me an idea about what i needed. Tools and materails for a starter help.gif

Well, to make a short story even shorter, I built this "thing". bugeyes.gif

I don't have to tell you it was turned by hand when finish was applied. blink.gif

user posted image
conehead
Mhackney,

I used a coathanger. I rolled the loop for the thread to pass through very carefully. I did not want to leave any scratches on the wire. A couple of guys on this site have used spring steel (the coat hanger springs well) and have a ttached a ceramic tip top guide to the end. That will be my next modification before the winter.
user posted image

Conehead
Boy you guys sure are a creative bunch, must make up for those days when the fish don't bite.
mhackney
Thanks Conehead. I use a tiptop stuck in the end of a 4" long spring but it is a little too floppy. I like the longer and stiffer "spring" the coathanger would provide. I'm going to give that a shot with my tiptop.

Michael
wvangler
Just finished my new wrapper. Here are some pics...

user posted image


user posted image


user posted image

As of now I'm using the string and pyramid weight system to hold the rod down, but I just bought some flat aluminum stock and made a few more small wheels so I can make movable arms for the top to hold wheels down on the rod. Not that it will work any better, but it will be more user friendly to slide the rod back and forth.

Mark Shamburg
Nice looking system there WV. What are the wheels you have one there?

Mark
conehead
Wvangler,

Dude! Nice piece of equipment. Man you put a lot of time and thought into that one.

Looks complicated, being from WV you can use that piece of machinery to wrap a rod, make moonshine, and roast a turkey all at the same time.

All kidding aside, I'm impressed; I like the fact that it's powered. Great when making longer wraps and drying epoxy.

Conehead
wvangler
The wheels are just a piece of $2.00 wall board stuff from Lowe's cut out into circles on a bandsaw then chucked up on a piece of all-thread on a drill press and sanded to perfect circles. The wood was just leftover scrap I had from building a deck. The tubes are 4' long pieces of conduit. Overall, I might have $25 invested in it.

It's not actually powered. That's just my pac-bay rod drying motor sitting beside the wrapper. I was just testing the height of it, it's not actually attached. I dip all my rods (bamboo) so the only thing I use the motor for is putting a couple of thinned building coats of varnish on the wraps prior to dipping.

I used it for the first time last night. Works pretty good. I had to turn the silk spool over so that the thread came off the bottom to keep the nut on the tensioner from tightening. This made the nut loosen, but I had a keep nut on the end that kept it from going too far. Seems to do the trick.

Now if I can just finish the attachments to get it to turn out a quart of 'shine I'll be set.
Mark Shamburg
For a couple bucks you can get some skateboard bearings, washers and springs.

Stack them like this:

Fender washer--thread spool--Fender washer--bearing--standard washer--spring-- standard washer--nut.

That should keep your thead tension from chaning. It also gives you a wider range of tension due to the spring.

Mark
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