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Mungo Park
Not having planing forms and wanting to build a Bamboo rod, the PMQ (poor mans quad) seemed the perfect rod type to build. This is a rod made out of two strips of bamboo which are plained freehand and glued together to make a cane rod.
I selected a taper from David Rays Taper Library. http://www.uwm.edu/~stetzer/Tapers/drtapers/ >From this selection of tapers I picked Sharpes Lee Wulf 5wt. This is a one piece rod so no need for ferrules and it would come from a 6 foot culm of bamboo.

It is wise to measure your culm to see that its thickness is at least half the taper thickness since it is made up of two strips glued face to face. This is relevant for the butt of the rod.

I have bought Tonkin Bamboo from Golden Witch as well as some from Home Depot to practice on. If you are on a tight budget it seems possible to make some of these rods from non Tonkin Bamboo. The bamboo on the left is the Tonkin Bamboo so you can see the difference in fibers.

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Here is the warning part , This is a build and use at your own risk hobby cane rod. I am simply explaining how I built my own. I do not accept nor take any responsibility of any kind what so ever, for any accident what so ever that may occur to any person or property, as a result of using all or any part, or passing on any part of the information, I have posted in this forum. If you plan on building your own and there is anything you feel should be done safer please do it in a safe fashion.

I split the culms in half by starting a split with a chisel. I then pushed the culm along a knife tip held in a vise on my work bench. I wore gloves for all of the splitting. The splinters and edges of this stuff is very tough and sharp and will cut your hands very easily.
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Once the culms were split I knocked out the dams with a hammer and chiseled out any remaining material with a chisel, this seemed to help with further splitting.

Next I flamed the insides of the culms, this helped to drive out any moisture in the culm and hopefully temper it some. This seemed easier than trying to build a drying oven. The pith on the inside got burned but the burn did not go deep enough to burn the fibers underneath. I moved the torch from the muddle of the culm towards the ends to drive the moisture out the end of the bamboo. I kept the flame on one area until the flames of the burning pith died down. It was a leap of faith not knowing how much was enough.

I also flamed some stripes on the enamel side purely for looks. I tried to space them out and not put them on the nodes. I think I overdid it a little as there is no pith on the outside to protect the fibers.

Flaming can be done with your basic propane torch, if you are under BTUed, watch that you do not roast the insides of the bamboo. A really hot torch will burn the outside very fast and heat the inside less. A cool torch will heat the inside more by the time it has burned the outside.
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Once flamed the burned pith inside the bamboo was brushed out with a wire brush and split to usable strips. This part was a little tricky, and took some practice with the cheaper bamboo. I found the best way for me was to start the split with a chisel and then lightly clamp the bamboo in a vise, leaving about one foot sticking out to be split. I then split it by pulling it apart with my gloved hands. If the split went off center, say to the left, bending the left strip out more, and keeping the right strip centered pulled the split back towards the middle.

The bamboo was split on half and then in half again until the strips were thin enough. How thin is enough? Wider than the butt of the rod and some room for error. Look at both inside and outside of the strips - my split did not always go at a right angle to the enamel. So the outside might be wide enough but not the inside, or maybe decide to build a lighter rod. I have no photo of splitting.

Once split the pith sides of the strips were planed flat, you can see the planed part as the black has come off already. Also there are the planes I used, the bigger one was best in the end producing long even curls with less hills and valleys. I found that I did the whole rod with one sharpening of my plane blade, here is a link to plane sharpening. http://www.rexmill.com/
This site also has information on how to tune up your plane.
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The enamel side of the nodes were filed/sanded until the dirt started to show in the deepest part of the node. Dirt collects in the node valley as the stuff grows and it gets grown over. This also was a bit of a unknown as to how much to take off so I stooped when the dirt showed.

Some of the enamel was planed/sanded off to produce a flat surface to rest on the workbench so I could plane the pith side.I did not go very deep and so it did not totally flatten the strip, but the edges would be planed of later anyways.
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The nodes were heated with a heat gun until the bamboo became soft and were then quickly clamped in a small vise to flatten the enamel side of the node. I heated the pith and sides of the bamboo mostly since this was the parts that would be planed off later if they got burned. I heated mine a little too much with hindsight and did darken the nodes some which has weakened then somewhat. I do not think a heat gun is the only source of heat that can be used but is the most common. I lightly sanded the enamel side of the nodes after flattening. My vise did not have any texture on the inside of the jaws so it did not mark the bamboo.
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Now the planing part starts!!! I had a half built wood planing form so I used it as a base and clamped the strip to that, enamel down . At five inch intervals I had masking tape with the taper thickness written on it. The base (the part near the roots) of the bamboo plant is thickest so it was used for the butt. It was easiest to take off long slices most of the whole length of the strip, going from butt to tip. With the long slice, once I got to the final thickness the next five inches up was not that far off and made the transition from one thickness to the next smoother. Planing produced a mountain of thin curls each one a few thousands of a inch thick, best to go slow and hit the mark. In one spot I went to far and the strip was to thin so I made a note on my masking tape and planed the opposite strip the equal amount thicker.
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When the strips were planed to the proper taper thickness they were glued together with the enamel side out. I used Titebond III. The strips were placed on some wax paper, glued up and clamped on to the workbench with a board on top.
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After 24 hours for the glue to dry the wax paper peeled of easily and the strips did not stick to anything but each other. I clamped the glued up strips onto the work bench and planed the strips sideways so I would get them started square. I did both sides like this. Once square I clamped the blank to the bench and planed the same as the strips. I turned the blank frequently to get it to taper in evenly on both sides. Do not plane the enamel, just the sides of the glued up blank.
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The planed blank was lightly sanded on the edges with 400 grit sandpaper. I cut the tip to length with a hack saw and cut off the corners to fit the tip top on. I glued the tip top on with epoxy, as well as the grip and reel seat. I made a winding check out of rod building thread. I coated the wraps with spar varnish.

After having built my first PMQ it was great to get out and do a few test casts as I have never cast a bamboo rod - it was great. I would think there are many ways to build a PMQ. The above is just one example.

Cheers,
Ron

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drgoretex
Woo-hoo! Bamboo boy is a writer now! Excellent post, Ron! Go Quad Squad! kicking.gif banana.gif headbang.gif

Ken
Oldschoolcane
Really nice - I enjoyed your post, thanks! Hows the rods action? Have you fished it yet?


Tim
Mungo Park
Tim:
Thanks for the kind words. I have not gone fishing yet but I did go lawn casting. This is the only bamboo rod I have ever cast. It casts 50 feet of line very easy, and my casting ability is about 50 feet, I do not get any more distance out of a 9ft graphite rod. So I think it is a great rod being quite short and casts as well as any other rod I have. It does bend right down to the grip when casting which is something new for me.
Cheers Ron.
rockymountain_brown
Mungo-very cool!!
How many hours do you think you put into just building the rod; not components, grip, etc.?
Kevin
Mungo Park
Kevin:
Before I tell you a builder posted on this forum he built a PMQ in a afternoon as a quick way to try out a taper bugeyes.gif . I did not keep track of the time, but here is a rough time line:
Half a afternoon to flame and split the culms I did more than one. One evening to plane one strip. One evening to plane the other strip and glue it up. One mor evening to plane glued up the strips. As you can see things speeded up as I went along. I think now with my second one I will be able to plane the two strips and glue them up in one evening. I still have strips split from the first go at flaming and splitting.
Cheers Ron
Jamie Crona
Ron,
That's about my pace also... Plane the first 2 strips & glue up ~1-1.5 hours. About the same amount of time to to plane down the other side. You could easily complete a blank in less than a week at this leasurely pace. If my wife and kids are out of town, I sould be able to have a blank completed in 1 day; however, that just dosen't happen too often. The part that always takes longer than you think is getting it straight... wallbash.gif wallbash.gif I probably spent a few hours doing that, I have to be relaxed & in the right frame of mind or it just seems to get worse.

Jamie
millerwb
I have built two and am working on my 3rd and 4th. I have gotten faster with each. I think all told, on the second one, I spent between 5 and 7 hours to make a two piece rod.

Brian
grandtrout
Great Description Mungo Park!!!

I've built a few of these using almost the same method as you did. For the last one I broke down and got a table top a belt sander (120$ at canadian tire). Saves a huge amount of time planing and sharpening! I take the raw strips down to .03 thou above the taper and then plane the rest of the way. I didn't spend as much time straightening the strips either , just rough belt sanded the sides to get them close enough for glue up. The last one I built (2 pc, 7 foot) took less than 3 hours from splitting the cane to glue up & about another hour to finish the sections. One word of caution, the dust from bamboo is super nasty so wear a mask.
JB
Mungo Park
Jamie:
You have it about right, my wife goes out of town with the kids in tow only when I have a swack of 12 hour shifts to work.
I have a table top belt sander but have not tried it on Bamboo yet. I also have a thickness plainer and keep thinking I can make a sort of jig to feed strips of bamboo into it. I the mean time hand plaining and good tunes seem to be working. This also gives me time to answer the hundred and one questions from my 3yo daughter. I am not in a big rush since once I get a rod built then I have to start on another one and this means buying hardware, Jamie makes his own so he is ahead of me in this department. headbang.gif
Cheers Ron.
Adam-
That was really cool to read, thanks for investing the time here to show your stoke.

It's fun to put it all together and then make the recipe online to show others...


Anyway, just curious, how do they cast?

Does it feel like a conventional rod when it is loading?

Accuracy?


Not knocking at all, not even, just obviously curious, I will build one myself after reviewing your post.


That is about the best compliment I could give you.
Jamie Crona
QUOTE
Anyway, just curious, how do they cast?

Like any other fly rod, what is going to affect how they feel will ultimately be the taper you choose.

QUOTE
Does it feel like a conventional rod when it is loading?

Yes!

QUOTE
Accuracy?

Probably more accurate than you can cast. hysterical.gif

Jamie
phg
What is a "conventional" rod? If you want a comparison to a hex-bamboo rod, the load and feel are similar.

What I have noticed is that a quad has significantly less tendency to twist. The quad shape naturally flexes in only 2 planes, side to side and up and down. As a result, the caster may feel that he/she is more accurate (how's that Harry?) when casting a quad.

It terms of handling, though, I doubt that you would notice a significant difference while fishing. A few weeks ago I was fishing with a friend's Mark Fitch Purist taper, a 4wt of similar length. The first thing that struck me, when I made my first test casts with my Z98 PMQ, was how similarly it handled. I won't say it was just as good, but I felt I could move from one to the other with little adjustment on my part.

Of course, once you've made a few PMQ's, you're going to start thinking more in terms of a 2SQ, built with top-of-the-line parts.... biggrin.gif
Adam-
QUOTE(Jamie Crona @ May 16 2007, 09:15 AM) [snapback]98209[/snapback]

Probably more accurate than you can cast. hysterical.gif
Jamie


I am not interested in building a rod that cast weird, that I wouldn't use.

I'll build one myself, from other accounts in addition to this one, they seem to be worth the effort.

Thanks for your answers though...
testwood
Really enjoyed your writeup on the PMQ, am going to make one !!. Its interesting you chose Lee Wulfs 6ft 5wt. I am a member of the Wessex Salmon and Trout River Trust here in the UK - www.wsrt.org.uk - and came across the following about a guy Julian Mills who was a great fisherman who had died recently .....'his friends among rod makers and fisherman were legendary including Pezon et Michel. Charles Ritz and Lee Wulf, Julian caught 3 salmon weighing 8 pounds each on Lee Wulfs 5' 10 1/2 " 5 weight rod that weighed 1 and 5/8 ounces (46 grams). ' My first PMQ will be with cane from the garden centre as I have only just found a supplier of Tonkin in the UK - am going to buy 5 canes.
phg
You can often find Tonken cane at the garden center, but you need to look at it closely. Look at the dark ring just below the outside enamel. These are the power fibers. They should be very dense, and about 1/3 the total thickness of the wall. It will often be painted, so you may want to surreptitiously scrape off some the paint to examine it closer. The one thing you don't want to see is diamond shapes in the power fibers. That indicates a different species of cane.

This picture shows a garden stake under a split of genuine Tonken cane. This stake, that is about 3/4" in diameter, is almost surely Tonken cane, and was used to make a very nice PMQ.
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jbarnick
When using a stake of such small diameter do you just live with the possibility of losing some power fibers while squaring off the enamel side since there is so much curve in the bamboo?
phg
Actually, I didn't try to flatten the outside curve. After splitting and flattening the nodes, I laid it on the enamel side and planed the pith side flat, (a small groove in the bench kept it stable) and squared the sides to that. The result is a slight radius on the top and bottom, but not anything you'd pay much attention to.

I think this stake would give 4 usable strips, this is the small end. The one I used for my first PMQ was a bit bigger and gave 6 strips.
testwood
Hi - In an earlier post I said how impressed I was with Mungo Parks PMQ post - superb - stating I was about to make one using Garden Centre cane as my Tonkin is not yet to hand. The cane I used was about 2" in diameter and 9' long, cost me 2 ($4) each - I bought 5 to practice on as I intend to make a 7' 5wt from Wayne Cattanach's book The cane have allowed me to practice Drying,Splitting Flaming, splitting into strips, rough forming planing and sharpening. - A voyage of discovery !! I am making final planing forms whilst awaiting the Tonkin.
I came across Mungo Parks post at exactly the right time, I needed to make a rod that I could use before the brown trout season ended!! I made Lee Wulffs 5' 101/2 , have finished the blank and had a cast on the lawn, lovely feeling, I think I will make another PMQ.
Can anyone help with my questions ?
In making a quad, is it ok to simply use the dimensions for a hex ? - in WWW.keone.com/bamboofly rods/design- philosophy.html, it states that a quad is stronger that a hex .
How do you size a ferral for a quad ?.
Are there tapers for quads on the web ?
Has anyone worked out a comparison between a 4 piece quad and a PMQ ?
What is a 2SQ.
Thanks for all the super posts , for someone like me just starting out in bamboo they are magic.
phg
Q: In making a quad, is it ok to simply use the dimensions for a hex ? In WWW.keone.com/bamboofly rods/design- philosophy.html, it states that a quad
is stronger that a hex .
A: No, for the same dimensions (width and height) a quad will have a bit more mass than a hex. If you don't make any allowance for that, your rod will be at least 1 line size heavier, and significantly stiffer. While no quad will ever cast exactly like a hex, multiplying each station dimension by .93 will give you a similar action, while a factor of .95 gives you an equivelent mass but a slightly stiffer action.

Q: Are there tapers for quads on the web ?
A: If you look around, you can find a few. It's easy enough to convert hex to quad. We can post a few, though. I've worked out a Payne 100 and the Cattach 8062 and 8063

Has anyone worked out a comparison between a 4 piece quad and a PMQ ?
-Yes, but not me. Tom Smithwick could probably answer that.

What is a 2SQ.
- A 2SQ (Two Strip Quad) and a PMQ (Poor Man's Quad) are the same thing. Most of us who call ours PMQ's use cheap parts to keep the cost down. Eventually I'll spring for some good hardware, but right now, I'm still learning.

Q: How do you size a ferral for a quad ?.
A: Someone named Kyle Druey came up with a formula that seems to work well. His explanation was a bit convoluted, but what it comes down to is multiplying the thickness by 72.192 and rounding up to the next size.


Here's a chart I worked up for my own use:
The first section are the tip tops

quad thickness Ferrule size
(in inches) (in 64ths)
--------------------------------
0.055 -------- 4
0.062 -------- 4.5
0.069 -------- 5
0.076 -------- 5.5
0.083 -------- 6

0.125 -------- 9
0.138" -------- 10
0.152 -------- 11
0.166 -------- 12
0.180" -------- 13
0.194" -------- 14
0.208 -------- 15

0.222 -------- 16
0.235 -------- 17
0.249 -------- 18
0.263 -------- 19
0.277 -------- 20
0.290 -------- 21
0.304 -------- 22
testwood
Thanks very much phq for a SUPERB DETAILED REPLY clapping.gif clapping.gif clapping.gif
The amount of info: available in the forum is amazing.
A soon a I have finished my inovative wink.gif set of final forms and have mastered how to upload photos I will post for your comments.
I have tryed to use the ' introduce yourself ' feature on the forum and keep bombing out however :
I live in Berkshire England, am 73, mad about fly fishing, had to give up golf , messing about with cane is definitely a curative. Thanks again

Mungo Park
here is a link to a woodworking forum showing how to make a plane blade sharpening jig. I thouht it fit with the spirit of the PMQ.

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=62537

Cheers Ron.


testwood
Hi everyone
I have built the blanks for the - EDWARDS No 25 Quadrate 7042 7ft 4wt - that I got from the Taper Library.
The blanks were built as a PMQ.
Can anyoune please help with 'Guide Location' and 'Guide Size' or give me a clue how to calculate same.
The rod is a two piece , would any 7ft 2 piece rod do.?
Thanks for help.
testwood
Great Day - Collected my Tonkin Cane today, 5 cane in a bundle - Superb Quality and pretty straight !! 9 per cane. Any blokes in the UK looking for a supplier give me a post. biggrin.gif
testwood
We all have to live our dreams.
The only cane fly rod I have finish built to date is my 6ft 5wt PMQ out of garden centre cane. Today I took it to the river and strung it up.
Waders on, centre of the chalk stream, hatch of some small upwing (mayfly) in progress.
Caught a small brownie about a pound - magic.
Only people who have caught on a rod made by themselves know the feeling thumbup.gif
Now I have some Tonkin who knows ?.
luv2fishnwv
I'm hoping that someone here can perhaps help me with a PMQ problem I'm having. What ever I'm doing wrong it's consistant. I have based my taper on a Payne 7ft 2 pc that I have. I love the way it casts works a fish. The butt section of my PMQ seems great. However the tip section (on my third one) has a very pronounced spline to it. I taped the guides and cast the rod. It casts great and only fueled my desire to build.
The pronounced spline is so bad it tends to twist the rod when bent or under a load. I clamped the blank to my work bench and attached a sandwich bag to the tip top. Once the load is enough to bend he rod about 10 or 12 inches off of level it twists. If the guides were placed on the glue line side this doesn't happen. It's my understanding that if this is done too much stress can be put on the glue line when the rod is being used. Is this true? Placing the guides on the enamel side does not have a twist when under load. I have checked and rechecked the taper. I can find nothing to point to the problem. I have a fourth tip glued up, but befor I begin to plane it I was hoping someone could point me in the right direction. When casting the rod ( unfinished) I can not tell a difference in the guides being on the glue line or the enamel side. I just want to do it right. I'd like to build each of my sons one and don't want to continue with what I'm doing wrong. I'd appreciate any help.
testwood
Hi - I bought some chrom plated brass ferrules from JannsNetcraft for my PMQ ($1.79) great value.
Should I make small sawcuts and try and form a square where the ferrule buts on to the rod, I think the process is called 'Crowning'. or is it OK to leave the ferrule as is ?. dunno.gif
Thanks
flykid
I just finished my tip section and realized the exact same thing as luv2fishnwv did. The problem is I have read that you shouldn't put the guides on the glue side??????????? dunno.gif dunno.gif
testwood
Hi - Gave my PMQ Edwards 7ft 5wt it first outing today. Not bad,not bad at all. Took some time to get used to the slooooow flexing. Ocne I got used to waiting on the backcast and feeling the rod flex right down to the butt we got on fine. Having painted the house I really should get back to finish my hex which is much more trying than I thought. wallbash.gif There are opportunities for cockups at every turn mad.gif
testwood
Hi - When planing down the strips to make a PMQ I wanted to hold the strips steady wallbash.gif and make measuring the thichness of the strips at the 5" spacings easier. Once the flaming and node flattening had been done I used Double Sided tape to stick the strips on to a piece of Conti board ( melamine covered used for shelving) its smooth, flat and cheap. It really does grip and makes the measuring with depth gauge or depth calipers quick and easy. Its also a good check the you have the strips flat before you start into planing.
Worked for me. thumbsup.gif Allow 2 thou for the tape thickness.
drgoretex
QUOTE(testwood @ Aug 30 2007, 01:46 PM) [snapback]104848[/snapback]

Hi - I bought some chrom plated brass ferrules from JannsNetcraft for my PMQ ($1.79) great value.
Should I make small sawcuts and try and form a square where the ferrule buts on to the rod, I think the process is called 'Crowning'. or is it OK to leave the ferrule as is ?. dunno.gif
Thanks


FWIW, I just *slightly* rounded the square off the last inch of the blank, so that when the ferrule is fit on, there is only a small gap on the flats where the ferrule is round. Each of these I filled witha very thin shaving of boo and *carefully* tapered it to the flat. You will find with the cheap ferrules that the blank end that fits into the male ferrule has to be shaved down a lot more than the female end. Just make sure you don't shave/sand down the blank too much, or it will be weak and snap right there in a deep flex.

Ken
phg
To elaborate just a bit more, when you wrap up to the male ferrule, think of it as strain relief. Pack it really tight, and jam it against the step. I go a bit further and double wrap the first 3/8" above the ferrule. Historically speaking, that has always been the weakest point on a bamboo rod. More breaks happen right there than anywhere else. It's the main reason why tip sections on antique rods are often 3" short....
testwood
Hi - Thanks for the advice on the ferrules.
Can I ask for further HELP ?. help.gif
Do I soak the cane strips in water before heating and flatening the nodes and straightening the strip ? I am sure I have seen that recommended somewhere. On my first PMQ I did soak them which made the strips easier to work on but as I was working with garden centre cane I wasnt the fussed. Now I am working with Tonkin I am concerned that the rod will turn out soft. Do you guys soak ? if so for how long?
Thanks
Mungo Park
Some guys soak them before plaining them, I did not, I had no problem with then dry. Do not soak them to straighten them you heat them to straighten them.
If you do soak them it would be overnight or for day or so, put al little bleach in the water to keep things from growing in it. Rember they might shrink a tad when they dry out.
Cheers Ron.
testwood
Thanks Mungo Park - The reason I asked about soaking the strips is I sometimes get charing when heating over the heat gun. I guess I shall have to be more patient and try not to heat up the strips too quickly thereby charing them.
phg
Charring on the pith side is normal and not a problem. You're going to plane all that off anyway. Even a bit of charring on the split edges is ok for the same reason.
jayhake
I would highly recommend that you soak your strips [i]before[u] you heat and press the nodes. IMHO the moist cane conducts the heat much better, the strips straighten easier, and they are easier to plane. Oh, and no charring...
gmreeves
Can someone go into a little more detail on how to install the round ferrule on the square blank? I plan on making the blank this weekend. I have my parts on order and they should be here on Monday and would like to complete the rod before the following weekend but am a little puzzled by the ferrule installation.

Do I round the bamboo where the ferrule slides on?
Do I build up the bamboo at the ferrule some how and then round it?
Do I just slide it on and fill with epoxy and try to hide the square gaps with thread wraps?
Combo of all three?

I guess it goes back my childhood days when I was told that the square peg wouldn't fit in the round hole.
Mungo Park
Go down about half way down the page.

http://www.rodbuildingforum.com/index.php?...14953&st=60

Cheers Ron.
testwood
Thank to Mungo Park, PMG and all I have just finished my third PMQ the Payne 100 that was posted and am very pleased with it, caused a mild sensation on the river bank when I explained what it was ' A poors mans what!'.

Managed to put into practice the advise on fitting ferules, whipping, glues etc. This rod I just finished with a few coats of Tung Oil. Found that some advice on writing name etc on the rod worked great on the dried Tung Oil with no running or smearing with a standard Gel Pen.

The problem is playing with PMQ's is easier then trying to complete my first Hex wich is turing into a battle of wills !

What type of thread do you use for transparent wraps Please ?
phg
Sounds great, but where's the pictures! banana.gif

I really like that Payne 100-Quad. The only fault I have with it, is that it has difficulty picking up a deep running beadhead nymph for a recast. As a dryfly rod, it's hard to beat.

For transparent wraps, use white gossamer silk. White nylon will become almost transparent, but the silk will all but disappear.
testwood
Hi phg - I promise I will learn how to upload photos with my post, first I may have to upgrade my camera.
Can you point me to the post where someone set out the method to post photos.
Thanks for the info on thread.
I was using a dry fly phg, first fish I caught was a small grayling which I lifted out putting an alarming bend it the tip, still it tested out a small flaw in the boo !. hysterical.gif
gmreeves
Another quick question. When I attach the reel seat and handle to the PMQ blank, should I build it up and sand it round like I did for accepting the ferrules?
phg
I do. It's a lot easier to work with, and saves weakening the rod at the grip.
testwood
Hi - I find it intersting that Heat Treating the strips for a PMQ is not discussed.
Other that flaming the inside of the half culm is does not appear that anyone heat treats futher and yet most people would heat treat a hex rod and not just to straighten the strips but to change the phyisical properties of the cane.
We apply a factor of .95 or .93 to adjust for cross sectional area and ignore heat treating. Why ?
Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Not that I have a heat treating oven - yet
Mungo Park
PMQ= POOR mans quad, you said it no oven, you could however flame the outside, flaming the inside is not a PMQ required function. Like you said it is a matter of having the oven, I do not and this thread is from me building my first bamboo rod which happens to be a PMQ. No form to go with no oven. (forms are hopefully comming this winter)
I would be glad to hear pro and cons of other heat treatment or no heat treatment. I striped mine on the outside and I did notice the striped parts were diferent to plane.
Cheers Ron.
phg
...and I heat treat mine with a PMO (poor man's oven). I have a 6' long steam box I made for woodworking, which is just four 1x6 boards nailed together to form a tube, open on both ends. I block one end with the paint stripper heat gun, put the 4 strips of bamboo in the middle, and partially block the other end with a piece of scrap wood. On high, it takes about an hour to get the box up to 300 degrees, and 30 minutes after that I can see the color of the 'boo starting to darken a bit.

The first time I tried using it, I put an oven thermometer inside the box, but turned so I could read the dial. Since then I've found an inexpensive thermometer that has a 4" probe. I now have a small 1/8" hole drilled in the side of the box that lets me monitor the temperature a bit better. For occasional use, though, and temperatures below 350, the wooden box works just fine.
testwood
Thanks phg - Next time I wont flame the inside, not that it was very effective. (dont laugh) hysterical.gif I use the gas touch that my wife uses to caramalize the brown sugar in the kitchen. She wonders why the nozzle is getting 'blued'. The torch may be lacking in the heat department for flaming but it is perfect for striping.

Mungo Park - Your Heat Oven is magic, simple and ultra low cost, I must make one. The PMQ I am making at present is the first I have not stripe flamed, and your right, it planes much easier and smoother. I guess it shows me how heat treatment toughens and hardens the cane.
Mungo Park
My torch is a home built for knifemaking so it has lots of BTUs, I have a bread maker that has seen better days, but I saved it and will try to build a box on top to make a oven, I think a pice of dryer or wood stove pipe wraped in insulation. I will have to mess with the breadmaker to get the element to come on when I want. Cheers Ron.
testwood
Hi - Since joining the RBF in July this year I have had a ball learning how to make cane rods that I can fish with. Having started out with the idea of making a hex rod I came to realise I did not have the equipment to make the final forms. Fortunately I came across the post by mungo park on making a PMQ and was off and running. The first two rods were made from 2" dia cane 9 ft long from the garden centre which worked fine and got me into splitting, flaming, planing gluing etc, and made very usable rods. Having found a supply of Tonkin cane I have made two more.IPB Image
This second rod was made to a Payne 100 taper 7'6" 4wt to a taper posted by phg. The rod casts great. The reel seat, ferrules, guides were shipped over from Netcraft.I bought a bunch of stuff which made the shipping cost worthwhile.
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PMG rod number four is a George Maurer 7042 taper multiplied by .95 - 7' 4wt and casts a magic dry fly. The rod has a slightly swelled butt. Managed to almost match the rosewood seat to the whippings ! I must build up the varnish on the whippings more before final varnishing. Timmys poured finish.

Whilst the PMG building has been going on I have finished planing the 12 tapered strips for a Wayne Catterach 7ft 5wt using experimental!! final planing forms made from Perspex ( Plexiglass) which I will post separately whistling1.gif Whats the saying about '...the mother of invention '
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