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Tiger wrap


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#1 mikewink

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 10:52 PM

This is a tiger that I just slapped some epoxy on.

Turned out pretty good I think. Thoughts?



#2 Bigdadyrods

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:16 AM

Came out real nice.

Randy

#3 John T.

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 08:27 AM

Good wrap!

John T.

How did people stay on earth before the Law of Gravity was passed?


#4 Rodbuilder

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 09:00 AM

Nice tiger clapping.gif
Paul Lindsey
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#5 roadking

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 09:18 AM

You got some nice movement and contrast. Good job.

Mike

#6 Dave Norton

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:14 PM

Great job, excellent movement!
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#7 Gnossos

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 07:52 PM

Looks great, Mike.

#8 bajafishgirl

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 11:11 AM

Ive never seen a tiger wrap before. It almost looks like marbling. How is it done?

#9 Gnossos

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 08:41 PM

QUOTE (bajafishgirl @ Apr 14 2012, 10:11 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ive never seen a tiger wrap before. It almost looks like marbling. How is it done?

The Tiger wrap, or Halo wrap, is done by applying a layer of 2 contrasting colored threads, moving the thread, applying a layer of thread finish, then a second layer of contrasting thread, and removing one of the two threads in the second layer, then more thread finish. This separation between the two layers of variably off set thread gives the optical effect. There are a couple of How-to articles, published in Rod Builder magazine, if I'm not mistaken, which I can't locate at the moment. If you do a search on this forum for 'tiger wrap' and 'halo wrap', you'll get more information on how they're done.
Gnossos

#10 hbell

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 08:25 PM

QUOTE (mikewink @ Mar 28 2012, 11:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is a tiger that I just slapped some epoxy on.

Turned out pretty good I think. Thoughts?




EXCELLENTE' clapping.gif

#11 mikewink

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 11:42 PM

QUOTE (Gnossos @ Apr 15 2012, 08:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (bajafishgirl @ Apr 14 2012, 10:11 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ive never seen a tiger wrap before. It almost looks like marbling. How is it done?

The Tiger wrap, or Halo wrap, is done by applying a layer of 2 contrasting colored threads, moving the thread, applying a layer of thread finish, then a second layer of contrasting thread, and removing one of the two threads in the second layer, then more thread finish. This separation between the two layers of variably off set thread gives the optical effect. There are a couple of How-to articles, published in Rod Builder magazine, if I'm not mistaken, which I can't locate at the moment. If you do a search on this forum for 'tiger wrap' and 'halo wrap', you'll get more information on how they're done.
Gnossos


Gnossos is correct.

I first start with a base wrap that is two contrasting colors. I like to use black and white. These two threads are wrapped simutaneously. After wrapping the base wrap burnishing is required to move the treads. I just do random patterns. Then I usually do 2-3 coats of epoxy. After the epoxy is cured for 12-24 hours a top wrap is done with two theads. (in this current wrap my base threads were black and white. The top wrap was garnet and white) after the top wrap is complete I removed the white thread on the top. Then epoxy over the top wrap. One important thing to remember is to get the best movement or tiger effect the two wraps need to be done in opposite directions. For example when doing my base wrap I wrapped from the butt to the tip. On my top wrap I wrapped from the tip to the butt. I do not burnish the top wrap. The top wrap will decide the color of the wrap. The white you see in this wrap is actually coming from the bottom wrap.

There are a couple different ways to do this wrap. This is just the way I do mine. I will be posting another variation before the end of this next weekend on another build.

Mike

#12 bajafishgirl

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Posted 11 June 2012 - 09:39 PM

QUOTE (mikewink @ Apr 19 2012, 09:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Gnossos @ Apr 15 2012, 08:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (bajafishgirl @ Apr 14 2012, 10:11 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ive never seen a tiger wrap before. It almost looks like marbling. How is it done?

The Tiger wrap, or Halo wrap, is done by applying a layer of 2 contrasting colored threads, moving the thread, applying a layer of thread finish, then a second layer of contrasting thread, and removing one of the two threads in the second layer, then more thread finish. This separation between the two layers of variably off set thread gives the optical effect. There are a couple of How-to articles, published in Rod Builder magazine, if I'm not mistaken, which I can't locate at the moment. If you do a search on this forum for 'tiger wrap' and 'halo wrap', you'll get more information on how they're done.
Gnossos


Gnossos is correct.

I first start with a base wrap that is two contrasting colors. I like to use black and white. These two threads are wrapped simutaneously. After wrapping the base wrap burnishing is required to move the treads. I just do random patterns. Then I usually do 2-3 coats of epoxy. After the epoxy is cured for 12-24 hours a top wrap is done with two theads. (in this current wrap my base threads were black and white. The top wrap was garnet and white) after the top wrap is complete I removed the white thread on the top. Then epoxy over the top wrap. One important thing to remember is to get the best movement or tiger effect the two wraps need to be done in opposite directions. For example when doing my base wrap I wrapped from the butt to the tip. On my top wrap I wrapped from the tip to the butt. I do not burnish the top wrap. The top wrap will decide the color of the wrap. The white you see in this wrap is actually coming from the bottom wrap.

There are a couple different ways to do this wrap. This is just the way I do mine. I will be posting another variation before the end of this next weekend on another build.

Mike


Thanks so much for the info. It looks great! I am starting a rewrap right now that I think I will try this on.

#13 John T.

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 11:24 AM

Went back and read the latest posts. I have a spinning rod to do for a door prize this August. Will look into a tiger/halo wrap for the split grip. Maybe solid colors on the ends and the specialty warp in the middle. Thanks for the reminder of what can be done with a bit of time and thread.

John T.

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