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Granger Guides


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#1 Skip Hosfield

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 06:10 PM

I have a Granger Victory that I want to put back in fishing condition. It is missing two guides on the mid section. Are they Bronze? They don't look black but they are not bright either. I'd like to keep everything as close to original as possible. However the stripping guide looks very small for modern synthetic lines. Is it advisable to replace it with a Mildrum, or even agatine?

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#2 Jamie Crona

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 07:47 PM

Call Rick at Ricks Rods and tell him what you need: http://www.ricksrods.com/ He carries NOS Granger guides and the original Rice's Orange & Black Jasper thread.

About the guide, the original is going to be small, you will be able to cast a silk line, but they are expensive. You may be able to cast one of Cortland's new Sylk lines for alot less. You could split the difference & talk to Rick & opt to get a NOS Stripper, just a little bigger - maybe an 8mm. I personally would not go with agate or agaitne as the original rods didn't have them...

Jamie

#3 scott.bearden

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 07:36 AM

FWIW, my pre-Wright & McGill Granger Champion came with a very small agatine stripper. I don't know about later models, and the Champion was their bottom of the line.

Scott

#4 grandtrout

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 11:30 AM

My 9050 had bronze guides on it (although they were quite tarnished). I replaced them with snake brand bronze guides one size larger to acomidate modern lines. No real change in the look of the rod and much more functional. The striper is likely agitine, not agate, snake sells these although the not in a bronze, however the black version is quite close. A mildrum striper would also be a good choice. If the rod is a 9 footer I've found the small stripers still work pretty good with modern lines. Sick a piece of fly line though it an see how much room you have, probably plenty unless your planning on shooting a ton of line.

#5 Jamie Crona

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 08:38 PM

Thanks Scott I stand corrected. I looked it up in Sinclair & the Granger Champion, while it was the bottom of the line, it did have a Garnix Stripper. tongue.gif All other models had Perfection Chrome Strippers. Grandtrout - was your 9050 also a Champion? I rebuilt a couple of tips for a friends W-G 9050 Special last winter & also left the guides original an was able to cast the 6 wt. ~75 feet, and I'm not a great distance caster. The only bad part in my opinion is the rod weighed a ton and I don't think I would want to cast is all day. I like the idea of keeping everything as close to original as possible especially with some of the better production rods, i.e. Granger, Phillipson, Heddon, & some South Bends, this maintains asthetics, history, and value. However, these rods were intended to be fished, so increasing the stripper diameter should have little effect on the value of a refinished rod. That being said, I'd still try and keep it as close as possible... I've got a 9' Heddon #14 in poor condition and I plan to restore it to Original when I refinish it.

P.S. Scott, the Champion became the Stream & Lake shortly after W&M took over Granger.

#6 Skip Hosfield

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 10:20 PM

Thanks to everyone for your opinions and facts about the old Grangers. I want to fix up this rod for my son who is an accomplished caster to fish with. He has a very strong arm - former wrestler and weight lifter, but he still said it felt heavy when he picked it up. I'm not sure whether I will replace the stripper or not. Fifty years ago I thought nothing of casting a nine foot cane rod all day. It's all it what one is accustomed to, I guess.

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#7 ajthramer

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 02:13 AM

when that rod was made agate/agatine was cheaper than carboloy or perfection chrome so the lower cost rod was supplied with them. funny how things change.

#8 Jamie Crona

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:50 PM

AJ, that's incredibly interesting, I had no idea...

#9 grandtrout

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 05:37 PM

Not sure what model of 9050 I have. I picked up a half a dozen rods from an guy i know an he threw it in! It must have been sitting behind a fire place because the deflection between the butt and tip was almost a foot when assembled. It was the worst of the bunch so I figured it was a trade rod with a granger type (not engraved) seat and striped it down compleatly & beat the hell out of it with a heat gun straightening it. I measured it out of curiousity and put it in rod DNA - to my surprise it was a perfect match to the 9050 arisocrat taper (only deviated .002 at any given station!) The rod was old and did have some intermediates. It still has the original granger style ferrules. I probably should have done a bit more reasearch before i took the vicegrips to the seat. Actually the rod belonged to Lyon of Lyon & Coulson fame and I was so excited when I got his orignal (L&C) black beauty and a couple of other neat rods that I just figured it was some old piece of crap. Opps -call it one less rod who's value can be embellished on ebay. And yes it does throw a country mile effortlessly. Judging by some of the other rods in the lot (a leonard tounament 50 1928, heddon 1928 & a hardy,1929) I bet it was built in the late twenties or early 30's. Who would have guessed it eh!
Yeah it is heavy - but i don't seem to notice when fishing it, probably becuse it throws such a sweet loop!

#10 ajthramer

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 06:17 PM

as recently as 1982 a blued genuine agate guide was 3.50 and a standard carboloy was 2.50 as was an agateen. i looked into it a bit as i was curious why so many quality builders replaced agate with carboloy on their rods. they didn't like broken strip guides any more than i do. they chose the higher cost carboloy as being superior to the old fashioned agate guides. fashion, not utility, is the reason agate guides are used now.



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