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#1 SAMPLER

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:31 PM

Here we go again.... I hope this doesn't get me band from the board but I have to ask.

After purchasing my Rikon Mini last year I have not done much to upgrade it. I still need a nice chuck for turning handles, reel seats and maybe a few bowls too.
I am looking to able to turn my grips after they have been glued to the blank but need some input as to what is the best and safest method to do so.

If anyone had time to take some pictures of your set up and bench layout it would be much appreciated. I'm looking for a complete over haul on my bench and will be moving things around so I have room to work with blanks on the lathe. Please consider this an opportunity to gloat and brag about your lathe and set up rolleyes.gif

Any suggestion for a nice chuck but reasonable on price (real reasonable.... whistling1.gif )

Here is a copy of my Rikon. Plenty or room for improvements.



Cheers,
Dana

#2 John T.

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:39 PM

Try this website- www.woodturner.org for great info on turning. Many on this forum turn things besides reel seats and grips.
I mounted my Rikon on the old lathe stand. Used a section of countertop to mount the lathe.

John T.

 

 

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#3 DonO

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 05:33 PM

It really isn't safe or even possible to turn grips on a long blank with a wood lathe unless you have a way to support both ends and several points along the length. I would turn the grip on a mandrel to final shape then glue it to the blank.

Don

#4 Goduster

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 05:43 PM

While I do not recommend turning on the blank, this is one of the options
http://www.amazon.co...y/dp/B00AO01JII

Ron Weber
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#5 SAMPLER

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 06:31 PM

I'm actually surprised by the negative thoughts around turning a handle on the blank. I had
visioned adifferent point of view.

Any thoughts about a chuck that sticks out as durable and reliable for a good price? Anyone looked onto the factory refurbished Novas?

Cheers


#6 DonO

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 07:07 PM

Sampler, We aren't saying that you can't turn a grip on the blank, just saying that you can't do it on your Ricon Mini as it is. You will bed extensions and steady rests so the entire length of the blank can be supported. You are going to need at minimum a PacBay lathe and best a Renzetti rod building lathe with the upgraded motor.

Goduster, The steady rest that you linked to will only adjust down to 1/2in so it might not control the skinny end of the blank.

Hope this helps,
Don

#7 jimk

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 07:08 PM

I turn grips and reel seats both on a pen mandrel - no chuck needed for that.

#8 canerodscom

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 07:25 PM

Is there a hole all the way through the headstock in addition to the #2 Morse taper? I can't tell from the picture, nor was one listed in the description of that lathe at Amazon. If so, all you really need is a 3-jaw chuck (1x8tpi mounting plate) and a live center for the tailstock.

Glue things up on the rod shaft. Use 2-3 turns of masking tape to protect the blank from the jaws of the chuck, gripping the blank in front of the cork. If the blank protrudes through the hole in the headstock, make some sort of support. (Mine is 2 pieces of 1x4 in an upside down "T", with a 1 1/4" hole through the upright piece. Glued a cork in the hole, and that's your bushing).

Don't glue on the reel seat till last. Wrap a coupla turns of tape over the butt end to prevent it from splitting. Center it with the live center in the tail stock. Don't explode the blank by forcing the live center in too deep.

Level the lathe carefully, shimming where necessary. Turn the motor on, grab some sandpaper, and start making dust.

Hope this helps,
Harry

PS -- practice with a scrap blank a time or two.

PPS -- I've made about 600 rods with a similar setup. Never destroyed anything yet, though I've done some pretty stupid stuff and somehow gotten away with it.

Harry Boyd
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#9 SAMPLER

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 08:28 PM

Harry, there is a center hole in the head stock so your method will work. I guess I never though about the blank going through the headlock and using a live center in the tailstock as the stabilizer. Now to buy a chuck.

#10 Greg LaPolla

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 08:52 PM

QUOTE (SAMPLER @ Jan 14 2014, 05:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Harry, there is a center hole in the head stock so your method will work. I guess I never though about the blank going through the headlock and using a live center in the tailstock as the stabilizer. Now to buy a chuck.


Rockler has the Nova G3 on sale this week for 139.

#11 kbproctor

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 10:25 PM

I have turned graphite blanks very similar to the way Harry described. I would add a few wraps of tape where the blank extends or comes out of the headstock. I wrap with tape to cover all of the blank the goes through the headstock. It might be overkill, but I haven't scratched a blank yet.

I like the idea for the support. I have just used my left hand. The only time I have done it has been on 4 pc blank butt sections so those are pretty short to begin with.
Kevin

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#12 Gnossos

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:13 AM

I help teach woodturning at our local high school where they have 5 lathes fitted with 5 different chucks. The students are flat out abusive to the gear, and the low priced chucks don't hold up to the abuse as well as the more expensive ones. You will certainly take better care of your stuff, so maybe you can do what you want with a low priced chuck. What's the best chuck is a never-ending debate and ultimately, you're the one who gets to decide the answer.

One way to get a solid chuck at a lower price is to opt for a tommy bar chuck (opening and closing with 2 short pieces of metal rod instead of a single wrench). They're not as convenient, though some production turners prefer them as in their hands, they're actually faster. Nova made the original one of these, and there are other brands available now as well, though they may not be as good in quality.
Another option is to buy Grizzly's knock off of the Vicmarc chuck. I haven't used one, but have heard satisfied reports. It's a 4 jaw chuck with just 3 different sizes of jaws available, probably the H6265 for your mini. Vicmarc jaws might fit, but I don't know.
The best bang for your chuck buck, in my opinion, is the Nova G3 chuck. If you go to the Nova USA site, you can buy a reconditioned model at a lower price than retail, and they go on sale periodically at woodcraft, rockler, or craft supplies.

As has been pointed out, you don't need a chuck to turn rod parts. Grips you can do with a pen mandrel, inserts you can do on the mandrel or between the centers that came with your lathe (assuming you have a way to drill the hole down the center). If you're moving on in your turning, then a decent chuck becomes a good investment.

#13 phg

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:23 AM

...but you do want a good 3-jaw chuck as well as a steady rest.

I get most of my supplies from PSI (they are on Amazon too). I have this chuck: http://www.pennstate...ml?prodpage=1CU which I think will meet your requirements.

I build my own steady rest, but the one referenced above will work fine as well. What you do is make a bushing to make up the difference between the rod diameter and a reasonable diameter for the steady rest. A 1" or 1.5" bushing will give you good control, and keep the blank from whipping around. I have a long bed on my lathe, so I also center the ferrule on a 60degree live center for additional support.

#14 SAMPLER

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 12:09 AM

Any thoughts on this set up....

http://www.pennstate...da-4-jaw-chucks



Will this pin jaw set hold a blank without to many issues?

Thanks for the feedback.

#15 John T.

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 10:18 AM

Here's my take on turning on the blank: if you screw up (which will happen at some time shocking.gif ), you have to remove all the cork from the blank. I feel that turning on
a mandrel allows you to take your time with no hassle of keeping the blank supported.

John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.




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