Jump to content


Photo

applying epoxy under power or not


5 replies to this topic

#1 StrykerDM

StrykerDM
  • Members
  • 18 posts

Posted 22 May 2017 - 08:37 AM

I've recently been using Prokote finish.  For those of you using that finish, do you apply it with the rod turning in the dryer already?  Or do you apply some, hand turn the rod, apply more, and so forth until the wrap is covered and later stick it in the dryer?  I'm still trying to figure out the best way to get rid of my wavy epoxy.  I was thinking I was applying too much, but it seems some people apply a bunch on the wrap and wick off the excess and do fine.  Any help would be great.



#2 Ron Mexico

Ron Mexico
  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florence, AL
  • Interests:Fishing and a good borboun

Posted 22 May 2017 - 04:08 PM

I apply mine at 50 rpm and then move to a 9 or 18 rpm dryer. I use the Fuji rod chucks on all mine and have to apply the bottom section when the rod is not turning sometimes.



#3 Golden Touch Decals

Golden Touch Decals
  • Members
  • 70 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Covington, VA
  • Interests:Fly Fishing, Custom wood turning for reel seats, Custom Rod Building, Photography

Posted 22 May 2017 - 11:28 PM

Hey Ron,

 

Applying thread finish can be quite simple and easy and applying finish can be horrible at times.....fortunately not at the same time!! The key is keeping it simple and don't get in a hurry, never in a hurry even if you are in a hurry!!! If you rush you will pay dearly for it so it is unnecessary to even try finishing in a hurry. Too many variables that can go wrong, and they will.

 

Previously, not long ago, I responded to a gentleman about what type of brushes should be used for finishing. Search for that one within the last three weeks and you can get some pointers there.

 

You say you are using Pro-Kote finishes. The original, med viscosity or the newer, thicker viscosity? Both are good and I have used both. The leveling qualities are great for both but the curing time between the two varies greatly which also affects the pot life. Pro-Kote original has a longer pot life and it can't be applied in heavy layers due to it's thin viscosity.

 

Here is what I do:

Make sure you have mixed exactly to a 1 to 1 ratio of each of Part A and Part B - very important. Mix for at least two minutes and then some-use a watch second hand EVERYTIME - consistency is what you are looking for. At any one time I rarely mix more than "1 CC" of each part...some people, and some product instructions state to use no less than "3 CC" of each part.  I have finish left over with the 1 CC mix so why would I want to waste all that epoxy if I am not having issues with the 1 CC mixes. I have been doing the 1 CC mixes since there was Diamond I epoxy - YES, that's how old I am!!

 

I use an 18 rpm dryer with a clutch (Mudhole) to apply all areas except long decorative wraps - again slow rpm = not in a rush!  For decorative wraps and decal areas that sometimes go to 10 - 11 inches in length, I will use the wrapping rollers and apply by hand and then place it in the dryer to trim out the ends and then place it in a separate dryer on another table to cure.

 

I apply multiple thin coats to because I know it is a waste of time to try to get a perfect finish in one coat - it can't be done consistently. Get a technique you like, put the epoxy on where you want it, let it level or apply a small amount of "flame" to thin out the epoxy and leave it alone. Don't apply the epoxy if it is obvious it's not flowing well to level-at this point, applying heat will not do well, it makes things worse. STOP, make a new batch and continue. Thickening epoxy at the end of it's pot life is worthless for an excellent finish - it won't happen so don't try to make it happen!

 

If I have a varied layout starting at the front of the grip such as: Hookkeeper area, 1.5" - then 5" of Rattlesnake skin - then 4" of decal area I start at the decal end by applying the base coat of finish for the decal and apply nothing on the skin or the hookeeper area at this time. I may end up putting three coats of finish on the decal before I put one coat on the snake skin and so forth....otherwise the 10-11" area would not be level across the entire worked area. You can see all the end results on the website listed below.

 

Cheap brushes are OK because of the leveling qualities of all of the epoxies. The brush is just used to move the epoxy from the foil sheet or pan to the threads on the rod. Credit Cards are for going in debt, not applying epoxy.

 

After the epoxy has cured well, look at all of the finished areas and correct any fuzzies, bugs, thread nibs, etc and apply the next coat. All areas should be fully covered and be neat and evenly applied. Do this until no defects exist at any wrap or worked areas. If there are any, you are not finished.

 

Oh, did I mention not to get in a hurry...??

 

Hope this helps.  Thanks for reading.

 

Charlie


Charles Armontrout

Sweetwater Fly Rods &  Golden Touch Decals

SweetwaterFlyRods.com

 

"I'll create your custom rod decals so you won't have to"

                                "The best decals are the ones you STICK with....."

 

 

 


#4 phg

phg
  • Members
  • 1,614 posts

Posted 27 May 2017 - 07:54 AM

Charlie gave you a long-winded answer, but yeah, that's about right.

 

I've done it both ways, and find I get better, more consistent results if I apply while turning.  I have used both a 6 rpm turner and an 18 rpm turner, and find I like the 18 rpm much better.  I use the cheap brushes that Mud Hole used to give away.  They clean up with alcohol, so I don't throw them away after one use.  Consequently, I have a lifetime supply.  The epoxy is self leveling, so the brush marks will disappear in about 5 minutes.

 

Very important!  It is almost impossible to get a good finish with just one coat, so don't even try.  Plan on at least 2 coats.  The first coat seals the thread and lays the foundation, and the second coat makes the finish. 

 

...And, yes, after you have applied the finish, you should wick off the excess.  Unfortunately, only experience will teach you how much is too much....



#5 StrykerDM

StrykerDM
  • Members
  • 18 posts

Posted 04 June 2017 - 10:08 AM

Hey Ron,

 

Applying thread finish can be quite simple and easy and applying finish can be horrible at times.....fortunately not at the same time!! The key is keeping it simple and don't get in a hurry, never in a hurry even if you are in a hurry!!! If you rush you will pay dearly for it so it is unnecessary to even try finishing in a hurry. Too many variables that can go wrong, and they will.

 

Previously, not long ago, I responded to a gentleman about what type of brushes should be used for finishing. Search for that one within the last three weeks and you can get some pointers there.

 

You say you are using Pro-Kote finishes. The original, med viscosity or the newer, thicker viscosity? Both are good and I have used both. The leveling qualities are great for both but the curing time between the two varies greatly which also affects the pot life. Pro-Kote original has a longer pot life and it can't be applied in heavy layers due to it's thin viscosity.

 

Here is what I do:

Make sure you have mixed exactly to a 1 to 1 ratio of each of Part A and Part B - very important. Mix for at least two minutes and then some-use a watch second hand EVERYTIME - consistency is what you are looking for. At any one time I rarely mix more than "1 CC" of each part...some people, and some product instructions state to use no less than "3 CC" of each part.  I have finish left over with the 1 CC mix so why would I want to waste all that epoxy if I am not having issues with the 1 CC mixes. I have been doing the 1 CC mixes since there was Diamond I epoxy - YES, that's how old I am!!

 

I use an 18 rpm dryer with a clutch (Mudhole) to apply all areas except long decorative wraps - again slow rpm = not in a rush!  For decorative wraps and decal areas that sometimes go to 10 - 11 inches in length, I will use the wrapping rollers and apply by hand and then place it in the dryer to trim out the ends and then place it in a separate dryer on another table to cure.

 

I apply multiple thin coats to because I know it is a waste of time to try to get a perfect finish in one coat - it can't be done consistently. Get a technique you like, put the epoxy on where you want it, let it level or apply a small amount of "flame" to thin out the epoxy and leave it alone. Don't apply the epoxy if it is obvious it's not flowing well to level-at this point, applying heat will not do well, it makes things worse. STOP, make a new batch and continue. Thickening epoxy at the end of it's pot life is worthless for an excellent finish - it won't happen so don't try to make it happen!

 

If I have a varied layout starting at the front of the grip such as: Hookkeeper area, 1.5" - then 5" of Rattlesnake skin - then 4" of decal area I start at the decal end by applying the base coat of finish for the decal and apply nothing on the skin or the hookeeper area at this time. I may end up putting three coats of finish on the decal before I put one coat on the snake skin and so forth....otherwise the 10-11" area would not be level across the entire worked area. You can see all the end results on the website listed below.

 

Cheap brushes are OK because of the leveling qualities of all of the epoxies. The brush is just used to move the epoxy from the foil sheet or pan to the threads on the rod. Credit Cards are for going in debt, not applying epoxy.

 

After the epoxy has cured well, look at all of the finished areas and correct any fuzzies, bugs, thread nibs, etc and apply the next coat. All areas should be fully covered and be neat and evenly applied. Do this until no defects exist at any wrap or worked areas. If there are any, you are not finished.

 

Oh, did I mention not to get in a hurry...??

 

Hope this helps.  Thanks for reading.

 

Charlie

 

This is super helpful to me as well.  Thanks!



#6 Washougal

Washougal
  • Members
  • 1,179 posts

Posted 10 June 2017 - 11:08 AM

I myself, I can't seem to get it done at dryer speeds, either I do it by hand, or at about 100-200 rpms to get it right. Either way a hand steady that allows me to lower the brush to the rod to pull the finish off the brush, and me not trying to paint it on makes a world of difference in the end result. Actually I use a spatula instead of a brush, but that really isn't that important as far as the end result.
If your finish is wavy, two things I think may be your problem. First you may be trying to get to many wraps out of finish that is already starting to set up, or if it's a long wrap like over a decal or decorative wrap your not also stroking the finish lengthwise on the blank to smooth the finish a bit and than being in too big a hurry to start the rod rotating instead of just letting it set and do it's thing like it was designed to do.



Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users