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FTOTY 2005 Bamboo Rod Build


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#31 OSD

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 09:44 PM

Are there any Specialty tools you don't have Chris? bugeyes.gif


#32 Toneloc

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 10:51 PM

Hey Chris,

Is there published figures out there for heat treating cane or did you determine your time and temps through trial and error?

What are you using for an oven?

Tony




#33 Sticky

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 09:47 AM

Did you make that beveler? It looks great! I imagine that cuts quite a bit of time.


You said that the strips are floppy when they come out of the oven, do they require any special handling while they cool to insure straightness?


When's you book coming out? headbang.gif

#34 Carlin

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 09:56 PM

QUOTE
Are there any Specialty tools you don't have Chris?

Hmm. Maybe a couple, but I've got those on order. wink.gif

QUOTE
Is there published figures out there for heat treating cane or did you determine your time and temps through trial and error?

What are you using for an oven?

There are a lot of differing opinions on heat treating. A lot of information can be found at Bamboorodmaking.com. Really though it mostly comes down to trial and error. dunno.gif

I have an oven that Bret Reiter made for me.

QUOTE
Did you make that beveler?

You said that the strips are floppy when they come out of the oven, do they require any special handling while they cool to insure straightness?


The beveler is from JW Bamboo Flyrods.

Nothing special for handling the bamboo when it comes out of the oven except for some oven mitts. smile.gif I simply lay them down on a flat bench to cool.

Chris

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#35 Carlin

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 10:07 PM

We're now ready to get down to planing. The first thing to do is to bust out the planes and sharpen and touch up the blades. The three I'll be working with are a 212 scraping plane, and two block planes, one with a rodmaker's groove.
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I have a very nice Tormek grinder that makes sharpening go very quickly. One wheel on the machine is a 800 grit Japanese sharpening stone and is for heavy shaping.
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The other is a leather wheel, or strop, that is used for polishing and touch up.
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Using the leather wheel for most touch up work, I only have to use the stone wheel once every dozen or so times I have to sharpen the blades. That is about 4-6 rods worth.

Chris

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#36 Carlin

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 10:10 PM

Now that we've got our tools ready, it is time to set the forms. Following a standard chart, I set the depth on the planing forms for the butt section of the rod at each 5" station.
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Here I've just set the 80" station:
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Chris

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#37 Carlin

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 10:26 PM

We're all set for the actual planing. I begin my making a few marks on the forms, one for the cuttoff point, and another (arrows) for the end of the current strip. By aligning each strip to the arrows, it is easy to be assured the node placement and dimensions will be consistent when we assemble the strips.
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I start planing by making 1-2 passes on each of the non-enamel sides of the strip to smooth out any bumps or chatter marks left by the beveler and to clean up the 60* angles. I set my non-grooved plane to remove curls .005-.007" thick. I use two clamps to hold the strip as I'm planing.
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After the smoothing passes, it is time to work on the enamel side of the strip. The idea is to remove the enamel, which adds no strength to the strip, and flatten the slightly curved face so we can more easily get accurate dimensions.

Using a sanding block I gently sand each of the nodes and then feel for any bumps.
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If I find a node that wasn't straightened enough earlier, I gently heat it, place it in the form and lock down the clamp on the high point. This compresses and flattens it as if it were in a vice.
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Next I make 1-2 passes using the 212 scraper plane to remove most of the rounded enamel.
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I clean up the rest of the enamel with a triangular scraper.
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After a final light sanding the strip is smooth, flat and ready to finish plane.
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Chris

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#38 Carlin

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 10:32 PM

After cleaning up the enamel, I make another 2 or so passes on each side of the strip to smooth and clean up the edges. I then take a very close look at the entire length of the strip and note if there are any areas that I need to address such as chipped nodes, or split edges, etc. I start on that side of the cane, at the tip and work my way backwards in order to begin to taper the strip. When I am satisfied with the one side, I make a few passes using my grooved plane set at .001-.002 to give a nice smooth face to the cane.
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After flipping the strip and, again, using the non-grooved plane, beginning at the tip and working my way back using longer and longer strokes, I complete the taper of the strip until I'm about .010" from final dimensions. At that point I switch to the grooved plane and make the final few passes removing thin, waxy shavings, until I reach the top of the forms.
user posted image

I follow the same procedure for the other 5 strips on the butt section.

Chris

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#39 Carlin

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 10:39 PM

After all 6 strips are complete, I put a piece of masking tape sticky-side-up on the bench and lay each strip, enamel side down, on the tape making sure they are all aligned, and each strip is in its proper order.
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The strips are then rolled up and secured by a few more rounds of tape.
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One thing that I forgot to mention earlier, and no one seemed to catch rolleyes.gif is how I kept the strips in the color-coded order that they came off of the culm in after beveling. Before I ran them through the beveler, I made a thin saw cut on the enamel side of each one with a mark that corresponded to a color. When assembled, I simply have to make sure I put the strips on the tape in the order of the cuts/color.
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Over the next few days I'll finish the tip strips in preparation for glueing.

Chris

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#40 Jeremy

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 08:42 AM

Chris, this is a really great thread you did for us. It's the MOST comprehensive explanation of building I've seen yet.

I'm following it very, very closely, with deep interest because I'm just beginning to consider building and want to find out as much as I can about those technical details that make all the difference.

I understand there's a lot of questions to be had if one gets into detail but you're presenting a really good series of steps here.

I can't believe it took me this long to find you guys!

Jeremy.

#41 Carlin

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Posted 19 November 2005 - 08:06 PM

Thanks for the kind words Jeremy. It is nice to know folks are getting some use out of it.

I finished planing the tip sections this afternoon. Not much to show here as it is the exact same process as the butt section shown above, just with smaller dimensions.

6 strips ready to be ordered and assembled:
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Taped and ready to roll-up:
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The three rod sections ready for glueing:
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Chris

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#42 Carlin

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Posted 19 November 2005 - 10:46 PM

Next up is glueing the blank. I begin by cutting the masking tape that is holding the strips together, and rolling them out flat.

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Using a sanding block with 320 grit paper I carefully sand off the apex of the strips, moving only from butt to tip, so that, when rolled up, there is enough room at the center of the section for all 6 strips to converge.
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The sections are then carefully cleaned of all remaining dust. At this point I double check to make sure I have everything ready. As I'm using Titebond 3, I don't have much time to glue, bind and straighten, so I like to be sure all my tools are handy. Once I make sure I have my binder setup, brush ready, brayer nearby, and a bowl of water and a moist rag, I'm ready to begin. I apply a quick bead of glue on one of the sections.
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Using a cheap toothbrush (bought off of eBay for something like $10 for 100) I cover the entire section thoroughly. Again, being careful to work only butt to tip so that the brush doesn't grab or split any bamboo slivers.
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It is then into the binder.
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I don't have any pictures of this process as it is so messy, but basically I bind the section, wipe it off with a damp rag, roll each flat with a brayer to settle the strips, then carefully but quickly straighten the section. Once it begins to setup I hang it up to cure and move on to the next section.
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Tomorrow the sections will be dry enough for me to begin cleaning off the binding string, and sanding off the glue.

Chris

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#43 Carlin

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 04:26 PM

I took a few minutes this morning and took the string off of the sections that were glued last night. So far they are looking good! I'll be able to get some measurements once the sanding and clean up begins.

user posted image

Chris

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#44 Carlin

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 09:49 PM

With the string removed, it is now time to get rid of the remaining glue and clean up the blank.

I begin with a sharp cabinet scraper and remove most of the hardened glue.
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Next, using a sanding block with 320 grit Norton 3x sandpaper (the best!) I carefully sand the blank until all of the pale glue remnants are gone.
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Once I have finished all 3 sections, I polish the blank using some oil-free 0000 steel wool, specifically looking for any remaining glue or other imperfections.

The last step in the blank construction is to seal it. I don't think this step is completely necessary, and many makers skip it, but I like to seal the blank at this point for a couple reasons. First it keeps any oil or other contaminates from soaking into or otherwise marring the blank, and second if there is ever a breech in the varnish, I know there is still a sealer coat underneath that provides at least some protection.

I use a concoction called Mike's Stuff from Mike Brooks. I apply it by generously rubbing it in using a piece of saturated steel wool. Once the Stuff begins to tack (just a minute or two) I wipe it all off using a clean rag and hang it to cure. The Stuff is designed to cure completely in about an hours time. Since we'll be dipping the rod in spar varnish later, I won't bother applying any further coats.
user posted image

Chris

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#45 Jeremy

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 07:32 AM

Chris, a question regarding your Tormek water wheel.

When the wheel face needs flattening do you have a procedure you'd care to share on how, and how often, you do it?

I'm searching for a different sharpening method. I am a serious woodworker also and do my sharpening using a 6" hand driven wheel that gives me a hollow grind to my blades but it never hurts to get more info./ education.

And, the look of that cleaned cane blank...it does something to a boy!

Thanks,

Jeremy.



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