Jump to content


Photo

Setting ferrules - I keep getting a bend between sections


4 replies to this topic

#1 parabellum

parabellum
  • Members
  • 66 posts

Posted 17 January 2018 - 10:51 PM

Hi all,

 

This is one of the more frustrating problems I haven't been able to shake. I keep getting a bend between sections after ferrules have been set. I can't diagnose where exactly the problem is coming from but it's pretty consistent from one build to another.

 

I use a wood lathe to prep both sections of a rod doing my best to center the section as much as I can. I use a file initially then sandpaper until the ferrule fits. I use top quality CSE ferrules. The final lapping of the male ferrule is done with steel wool so it fits the female end and typically only bare minimum amount of work is needed here.

 

Nevertheless, when the glue dries and I put the rod together the tip will sit at an angle. I work around this by trying different positions until the bend is downward facing so at lest the rod looks straight when you look top down its length and after adding guides and everything it's less obvious, but this is far from ideal and extremely frustrating.

 

Any ideas or suggestions?



#2 Tim Anderson

Tim Anderson
  • Members
  • 146 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 January 2018 - 01:34 PM

Even the slightest misalignment of a ferrule can result in what looks like a significant bend.  I know this all too well, having developed a whole series of steps to ensure that my carbon-fiber spigot and sleeve ferrules are as straight as possible.  I know of two sources of such "bends" with normal nickel-silver ferrules.

 

First, the ferrules themselves are not straight.  Several years ago, a top-notch cane rod maker had several CSE ferrules which produced a bend.  That was quickly resolved with the maker and has not happened since.

 

Second (and more likely), your prep of the ferrule stations is at fault.  Unfortunately, this is very easy to have happen and using a lathe provides no guaranty that the ferrule will sit straight.  I know this because of MY ferrules.  For prepping stations for conventional metal ferrules, I strongly suggest looking at the areas where bamboo is being cut off of the blank's apexes.  They should all be the same width and have EXACTLY the same shape.  So should the part of the flat remaining between the cuts.  If not, the ferrule will end up crooked on the blank.  If you see the problem developing during your lathe prep, remove the final material by hand.  You don't need to measure with any tool.  Your eye will see the tiniest of differences.

 

Tim



#3 parabellum

parabellum
  • Members
  • 66 posts

Posted 19 January 2018 - 12:11 PM

Thank you for chiming in Tim! Could you maybe slightly elaborate on some of the things you mentioned?

 

"They should all be the same width and have EXACTLY the same shape."

Do you mean that the apex of the butt where the ferrule sits needs to match in size and shape it's tip counterpart?

 

"If you see the problem developing during your lathe prep, remove the final material by hand"

I'm trying to visualize what this means. As I'm working that section of the blank with lathe what what exactly am I monitoring for? The development of an "oval" if looking at the cut head on? Or a "bend" in that prepped section compared to the blank immediately below that prepped section if looking at it from above and rotating slowly?

 

Just trying to make sure I don't misunderstand the suggestion as this is driving me mad.



#4 Tim Anderson

Tim Anderson
  • Members
  • 146 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 19 January 2018 - 04:54 PM


"'They should all be the same width and have EXACTLY the same shape.'"

"Do you mean that the apex of the butt where the ferrule sits needs to match in size and shape it's tip counterpart?"

 

No, I mean just the station you are cutting for either the male or female part of the ferrule.  When cutting the station, the apexes of the blank are removed for a distance of an inch or so along the blank.  Each of those lengthwise cuts should look identical to the five others (assuming a hexagonal blank) from one end to the other.  So should the non-cut areas of the blank's flats look like each other.

 

"'If you see the problem developing during your lathe prep, remove the final material by hand'"

"I'm trying to visualize what this means. As I'm working that section of the blank with lathe what what exactly am I monitoring for? The development of an "oval" if looking at the cut head on? Or a "bend" in that prepped section compared to the blank immediately below that prepped section if looking at it from above and rotating slowly?"

 

If the longitudinal cuts of the blank's apexes are not all alike (see reply above), I suggest taking the blank out of the lathe and finishing up the station prep with a file or scraper because then you can make all of the cuts match each other.

 

Tim


#5 parabellum

parabellum
  • Members
  • 66 posts

Posted 20 January 2018 - 02:34 AM

Thanks again!





Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users