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Ferrule wrapping step-by-step


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#1 canerodscom

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 03:51 PM

Another forum member asked me to outline the steps I take when wrapping ferrules. Since I was at that point in the current rod construction, and since it would prove a good project for my new camera, I said "Sure, why not?" Spent some time after church this afternoon putting this together.


Here's the wrapping set up I use, an Eco Wrapper by Clyde Alho. Notice that I have the cradles turned backwards since I do not use them. I wrap while holding the rod section in my hands rather than in cradles. As this essay progresses you will likely notice that all my wraps are started from the left and wrapped to my right. I can wrap from right to left, but it is not natural to me. Wrapping everything from left to right means lots of swapping ends back and forth on the rod section... But for me, that is still more efficient than wrapping both left to right and right to left.


Below is a typical ferrule wrap just being started. This rod will have deep red main wraps and black tipping wraps. The tipping for this photo essay is larger than I might normally use to help it show up. This is 00 Gudebrod black silk, five turns. For tipping I might typically use three turns of Gudebrod 00, or five turns of YLI 100, or even (please God, no!!) Pearsalls Gossamer with five turns. Here I have already made the first wrap just outside the serrated ferrule tabs. The wrap has been slid firmly against the ferrule tabs with my fingernail. I always make this wrap first because it gives me something to snug up against when I start the next wrap in the picture to follow. ( I have no idea where that tiny little piece of red thread on the ferrule came from. It was too small to notice with my bare eyes and I did not see it until looking at the pictures)


Several turns of red thread have been started. Notice that there is a gap between the red thread and the ends of the ferrule tabs and the black thread? At this point, once this wrap is well started and won't likely come undone, I will use my thumbnail to slide this wrap out to the ends of the ferrule tabs and against the initial black wrap.

Also, notice that the thread going back to the spool is not perpendicular, or 90 degrees from the wrap. Instead it is at a slight angle to the left at the top. I think that helps keep each turn of thread next to the previous turn.


Over the process of making the next four or five turns I have slowly snuggled the two wraps together, carefully covering the very ends of the ferrule tabs completely. Here you also get a nice look at the brass ferrule pin under the bluing and the initial coats of varnish on the rod and ferrules before beginning to wrap the ferrules and guides.


Now it's time to trim the tag end remaining from starting the red thread wrap.


Trimming the tag end after 8-10 turns of red thread.


In this photo the red wrap had been continued out to the end of the ferrule tabs and the tie-off loop has been inserted.


Here the tag end has been pulled through and is ready to be trimmed. If your eyes are sharp you might also notice that at the left hand end of the red wrap, slightly towards the bottom, there is a tiny gap between the red and black thread. The camera caught this gap because it can see better than I can. No worries, we will burnish that gap away in a step or two.


Trimming the tag end is accomplished with a double edged razor blade. I find single edged blades are not sharp enough. In the photo the razor blade is about 1/8" above the wrap and is being lowered to the wrap. Before the tag end is trimmed the blade will be lying completely flat against the wrap and exactly next to the tag end. The razor is not moved to the tag end -- instead, the tag end is pulled against the stationary razor blade. Can you see that the tag end is not vertical, but angled slightly to the right? It will be a little farther to the right as the tag end is cut. I have to admit that it was tough to get this shot with one hand while holding the camera with the other hand!



There was a tiny nub of the tag end protruding above the main wrap after the tag end was cut. The burnishing tool made that tag end disappear under the main wrap by gently sliding the threads around next to each other. Burnishing also made the little gap between the red and black threads go away.


Here I have turned the rod section end for end and started a red wrap on the bamboo. This wrap adds a little reinforcement to the bamboo in an area of high stress. Five turns have been made on the bamboo, and the red wrap has been snugged against the black wrap which was already there. I really like having something firm against which to snuggle the wraps. It makes things easier.


A tie-off loop has been inserted and a couple more turns of red have been made. And oops, I see a gap in the red thread to the left. Looks like I have some more burnishing to do. Cameras can see better than old guys.


The tag end has been pulled through via the tie-off loop and is ready to be trimmed away with the double edged razor blade in exactly the way it was done on the previous wrap.


After I trimmed the red wrap I used my thumbnail to gently slide it against the black wrap to the left. Now I have started a single turn of another black thread which will be the final touch at this ferrule. This is mostly for decoration, but I suppose it also adds a tiny bit of reinforcement to the bamboo at this high stress point


After only a single turn of black thread I am adding the tie-off loop.


Four additional turns of black thread have been completed and we are ready to cut the thread and insert the tag end through the tie-off loop


The black thread has been passed through the tie-off loop and is ready to pull under the previous wraps.


The tie off loop pulled through and the tag end has almost come out from under the main wrap. My little Sony RX100 does a pretty fair job, huh?


Using the thumbnail to help the black thread wrap nestle firmly against the red wrap. The pictured tag end will be trimmed away momentarily. The entire wrap will be very gently burnished to smooth things out a little and we will be finished.



Hope this proves helpful to some. If you have questions, just let me know.

Harry
Harry Boyd
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#2 scott.bearden

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 03:58 PM

clapping.gif

Thank you Harry!

#3 Tigertrout

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 03:59 PM

clapping.gif Thank you! Very helpful for beginners like me!

#4 SAMPLER

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 05:07 PM

Another great example of classic craftsmanship from Mr. Harry. Thank you for sharing.

PS... nice camera work thumbsup.gif

#5 SAMPLER

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 05:09 PM

Admin, I vote for this to be "pinned" please.



#6 canerodscom

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 08:36 PM

"Mr. Harry" is my father. I'm just "Harry," okay? smile.gif
Harry Boyd
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#7 John A.

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 09:48 PM

Very nice Harry. Thanks for taking the time to do it.

John A.

#8 CowDawg

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 10:26 PM

thumbsup.gif ... Nice...

#9 canerodscom

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:33 PM

Thanks for all the kind words. No questions, huh? I must have done a decent job! clapping.gif

Harry
Harry Boyd
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#10 PowerFibers

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:09 PM

I had a question, but then I read the post a little closer. Nice job Harry!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Todd Talsma
Editor - Power Fibers Online Magazine
Webmaster - Bamboo Rodmaking Tips Site

#11 SAMPLER

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:46 PM

Okay, I'll ask...

Why did you choose to pin the ferrule so high on the ferrule and not down low and have it covered up by the wrap? Is there an advantage?

D

#12 canerodscom

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 09:33 AM

Good question. There are at least two reasons. First, the lower you put the pin the more it has a fulcrum effect, stressing the bamboo more. The ferrules flex least where the male slide is inside the female barrel. That's really the safest place to pin a male ferrule. But you obviously cannot pin the female there. I pin the male and female ferrules the same distance from the outer ends. It's just a looks thing, another little step that shows one has thought about where things should go.

Second, and more importantly, these are stepped ferrules which are made by soldering one tube inside another. By pinning where I did, the two pieces of tubing are not only soldered together, they are also pinned together. Should the solder joint break the pin will theoretically hold things together. Also, it's simpler to drill the hole for the pin in the larger body (cap) of the male ferrule than in the slide. And by placing the pin in the cap (body) there is no risk to having a protruding pin hang in the interior of the female ferrule.

There are other options for pinning which are valid. But I would strongly urge you NOT to place the pin under the thread wraps. The ferrule is at its thinnest and weakest there.

Does that help?

Harry

QUOTE (SAMPLER @ Jan 7 2013, 10:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Why did you choose to pin the ferrule so high on the ferrule and not down low and have it covered up by the wrap? Is there an advantage?


Harry Boyd
[email protected]
http://www.canerods.com
Heat Treating Fixtures and Ovens
(318)435-5476 home phone
(318)282-1825 Shop/cell phone

#13 SAMPLER

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:30 AM

I'm thinking about using brass for pins as well and I like the look which show a bit of creativity and uniqueness. I'm not bluing the ferrule so the pin will show clearly against the nickel silver ferrule.

Thanks again for sharing.



#14 canerodscom

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 12:22 PM

The pins are actually more difficult to see in bright ferrules than in blued. You can barely see the pin in the top ferrule pictured below, and I can't spot it at all in the other ferrules. Of course, the pin may just not be in the photo.

Harry Boyd
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Heat Treating Fixtures and Ovens
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#15 DreamWeaver

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 10:49 PM

Hi Harry
One question who does your nails!!! smile.gif
by the way did you make your burnishing tool?
take care
Barry
Dream Weaver Custom Rods
www.dreamweaverrods.com



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