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Tools you'll need to build a bamboo rod.


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#1 Carlin

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Posted 02 July 2005 - 03:32 PM

Here is a list of the essential tools that youíll need to make your own bamboo rod. Not included are the standard rod components such as ferrues, seat, guides, etc.

The short and sweet version thanks to Darryl Hayashida:
user posted image

Or the longer, more in depth version:

You can click on any image to be taken to a website that offers that product. I chose the websites for no particular reason, so donít necessarily take them as suggestions of where to get the items, nor, in many of the cases, precisely which ones to get.


Pencil


Measuring tape


Various grits of sandpaper - 100-400

File for prepping nodes


Binding string - I've used kite thread before, but hand quilting thread works great too.


Glue - Titebond 3, Gorilla Glue, ProBond, and quite a few other, more or less benign, types can be used.


Torch - Bernz-o-matic for around $30 at any hardware store works great. Either propane or MAPP gas is fine.
user posted image


Froe and mallet for splitting the culm. Any tough knife that you donít mind hitting with a mallet is fine.

Froe:
user posted image

Mallet:
user posted image


Fine toothed saw for cutting the culm:
user posted image


Alcohol lamp or a heat gun. Cost: $20+

Wagner Alcohol Lamp:
user posted image

Heat Gun:
user posted image


A smooth-jawed vice for pressing nodes:
user posted image


A well tuned adjustable mouth block plane. A Lie-Nielsen is the best, but a properly adjusted Stanley 9 1/2 will work fine if you put in a top quality Hock replacement blade (~$40 for the blade). Veritas and Record also make good quality block planes (don't get a low angle). The biggest advantage to a Lie-Nielsen or Veritas is they are ready to go out of the box and already come with a top-notch blade. Cost: $70-$150

Stanley:
user posted image

Record:
user posted image

Veritas:
user posted image

Lie-Nielsen:
user posted image


Sharpening system for the plane blades. This can be as fancy as a Tormek grinder, as utilitarian as a set of DMT diamond stones or standard water stones, or as low tech as various grits of wet/dry sandpaper and a sheet of thick glass (aka 'Scary Sharp System'). Whatever way you go your plane blades have to be SHARP. Sharper than a razor. Cost: ~$20-$400

Scary Sharp system information:
http://www.shavings.net/SCARY.HTM

Japanese Waterstones:
user posted image

DMT Diamond Stones:
user posted image

Tormek Grinder:
user posted image


An adjustable blade holder like a Veritas jig is essential for hand sharpening. Cost: $30ish
user posted image


Rough planing forms (or a beveler smile.gif ). You can actually use your regular forms for roughing as you first get started, or you can easily make a set from wood with a router and/or table saw.

Wagner Roughing Forms:
user posted image


Depth gauge/dial indicator with 60 degree point. Cost: $50+ depending if you make your own base and/or point. Lee Valley has what appears to be a decent digital depth indicator for $38.50.

Digital depth indicator:
user posted image

Bellinger Depth Gauge with stand and point:
user posted image

A good set of calipers. Digital or dial. Cost: $15+

Calipers:
user posted image

Digital Calipers:
user posted image


Finish planing forms. This is the only really pricey item on the list, but also the most important. Cost: ~$100 for hand made, to $390-$450 for Colorado Bootstrap or Blauvelt's, to $1050 for swelled butt Wagner forms.

Colorado Bootstrap Forms:
http://www.coloradob...ap.com/fishing/

Blauvelt Planing Forms:
user posted image

Bellinger Planing Forms:
user posted image

Wagner Planing Forms:
user posted image


A handful of single edge razor blades, or even better, a cabinet scraper (I use one that I use for tuning skis that I've had for years).

Lie-Nielsen Cabinet Scraper:
user posted image


Sanding Block. This Veritas is the ultimate and worth twice the price!
user posted image


I think that is everything. All the rest of the stuff is the same stuff needed for wrapping any fishing rod. Total cost? Well, a lot of that depends on how many of the required tools you already have, and how fancy you want to go. Iíd say the minimum if you had to buy everything would be around $400-$500 plus the cost of your planing forms.

Chris

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#2 Troutchaser

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 12:52 PM

Chris, might I be so bold as to add:

String Binder (either hand binding or contraption based). Folks see here for examples Binders
.....troutchaser
I fish bamboo..... For some reason it speaks to me.

#3 Carlin

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 02:54 PM

A binder would be a nice item that would fit into the 'upgrade' category. Definitely nice to have, but not an essential. Here are a some binders and a few other upgrades:

Tim Preusch 4-String Binder:
user posted image

Golden Witch Binder:
user posted image

Bellinger Binder:
user posted image

Wagner Binder:
user posted image

JW Binder:
user posted image


Bret's Bamboo Ovens:
user posted image


Bureau Beveler:
user posted image

JW Beveler:
user posted image

Chris

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#4 Fly1

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 09:02 PM

And a file for fitting ferrules wink.gif

Ken cool.gif
You can only be lost if you care where your going. - Harvey Morrison

Credit River Cane Rods
Credit River Anglers Association
Ken Paterson, Streetsville, Ontario

#5 Carlin

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 09:20 PM

Personally, I'm a sandpaper kinda guy. What type of file do you recommend Ken?

Chris

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#6 Fly1

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 09:56 PM

I prefer a wide file to get a uniform cut across the corners of the blank where the ferrule will sit. I also prefer a fine metal cutting file that won't remove too much material on a single pass as I work my way around the corners of the blank in order to maintain my centre.

Ken cool.gif
You can only be lost if you care where your going. - Harvey Morrison

Credit River Cane Rods
Credit River Anglers Association
Ken Paterson, Streetsville, Ontario

#7 karelgol

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 01:48 PM

What does the front adjustment knob on a stanley 9 1/2 adjust? and could you do without this adjusting? I ask this because on ebay there is a stanley 220 for sale, which is in principle the same as the 9 1/2 but without the front adjustment knob.

Karel

#8 OSD

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 02:00 PM

It adjust the throat where the shavings exit
And I believe you can do with out it

Bob




#9 Carlin

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 12:46 AM

Karel,

Like Bob said, the lever adjusts the size of the mouth opening (the space between the blade and the base of the plane.

The problem with not having this adjustment is you will have more chipping near nodes, and a greater possibility of having the plane take off too much of a shaving. I wouldn't go so far as to say that the adjustment was 'essential', but I think it is important.

Chris

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#10 karelgol

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 03:23 AM

OK, thanks Bob and Chris. I allready had a Stanley, but that is a G12-004, with a grooved sole. Reading a bit more, i learned that that wasn't the most ideal plane to use. In toolshops over here, the only planes i can find are Baileys and Handymans and those things where you put something like a razor blade in for a blade (think it's the RB5). But i still have time, can't start on the planing forms until school starts again and through the net i found that the national bamboo information centre is located near the place where we will spent our hollydays banana.gif . I hope this winter i'll have all the equipment to make a good start at boo-building.

Karel

#11 millerwb

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 07:11 AM

Karel,

A Bailey plane is essentially a Stanley. I believe that Stanley bought Bailey many, many years ago. A Record plane from England would be fine as well.

Brian

#12 DHayashida

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 05:22 PM

I have since aquired more contraptions and other miscellaneous tools, but in one picture these are the only tools I need to make a bamboo rod. No oven, I flame my rods. No binder, for years I bound by hand using the spinning reel you see in the picture. I used a wipe on varnish and then wrapped the guides on over the varnish. The only tools in the picture that cost more than 40 - 50 dollars is the planing form. The wood board in the middle is my roughing form.

user posted image

Darryl

#13 OSD

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 05:43 PM

Here is my version of a power beveller

user posted image

user posted image

Bob



#14 KRC

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 11:51 AM

QUOTE (DHayashida @ Sep 12 2005, 05:22 PM)
No oven, I flame my rods.

I like Darryl's "MacGyver" approach!

Quick question/clarification - in general you don't need a oven if you flame a rod?

Thanks,
Kelvin

#15 DHayashida

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 12:21 PM

QUOTE (KRC @ Sep 15 2005, 11:51 AM)
QUOTE (DHayashida @ Sep 12 2005, 05:22 PM)
No oven, I flame my rods.

I like Darryl's "MacGyver" approach!

Quick question/clarification - in general you don't need a oven if you flame a rod?

Thanks,
Kelvin

Take a look at:
http://users.adelphi...bamboo_culm.htm

No oven needed, make a light or dark rod. For a dark rod lightly flame the outside of the culm.

Darryl



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