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FTOTY 2005 Bamboo Rod Build


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#16 matsoberg

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 05:19 AM

This is going to be interesting! wub.gif

#17 JarrodRuggles

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 09:35 PM

looking good carl!! thumbup.gif

#18 Carlin

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 10:09 PM

Next we need to work on the nodes. In a whole culm, the nodes are the joints that you see from the outside. They are an intermix of fibers from above and below. Inside the hollow of the culm they create a 'dam' that helps strengthen the bamboo stalk.
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All of the nodes on our split strips look like the image below. We need to smooth and flatten these out before we proceed.
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For expediency's sake, rather than use a file to smooth the nodes, I prefer to use a belt sander mounted on its side outfitted with 120 grit paper.
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The pith, or inner, side of the node is flattened first.
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I then, very, very carefully smooth out the enamel side. I take off just enough to remove most of the nodal hump. Most nodes will still require some flattening after they've been sanded flat.
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Once finished, the node is fairly flat.
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A finished batch of strips ready for straightening!
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Chris

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#19 Mark Shamburg

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 11:20 PM

Assuming a 2 tipped rod what do you do with all the extra pieces of cane from the lower half of the culm?

#20 karelgol

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 06:51 AM

Ehm, Chris, why not heat and press the nodes flat? Just curious, as this isn't the "Cattanach" rolleyes.gif way i suppose.

Karel

#21 Gary Madore

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 07:44 AM

This is fascinating, Chris, thanks.

You almost have me thinking that a mere mortal like myself could do this.

ALMOST sad.gif

Cheers!

Gary

(nice sander, BTW!)

Orvis ROCKS!


#22 Carlin

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 12:32 PM

QUOTE
Assuming a 2 tipped rod what do you do with all the extra pieces of cane from the lower half of the culm?

They end up in the ever-growing pile in the corner of my garage! rolleyes.gif

QUOTE
why not heat and press the nodes flat?

Actually the sanding simply replaces the 'Planing Diaphragm Ridges' step in Cattanach's book. I'll be heat/vice pressing the nodes as well. thumbsup.gif

Chris

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#23 Fly1

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 08:08 PM

Now I just use the belt sander to flatten the whole area around the node. I think that heating it up and crushing it in a vise would only make a weak spot weaker dunno.gif

Ken cool.gif
You can only be lost if you care where your going. - Harvey Morrison

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#24 matsoberg

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 04:32 AM

I use a belt sander too. Saves me a bit of time, I think.

Actuallly after straightening, I use the sand belt again, to shape the splitted strip closer to 60 degees to make the rough planing easier/faster.

Is the enamel more easy to remove from the bamboo when itīs flamed, than if oven heat treated only?

// Mats

#25 Carlin

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 11:35 PM

After sanding the nodes I find that some of them are still either bumpy or wavy enough to warrant some more work. Depending on the culm, somewhere between 1/4 to 1/2 of the nodes will need extra straightening.

Here is a node that would take a lot of sanding to get flush and smooth. More than I would feel comfortable doing, so it is these types of nodes that I'll press. Also notice the path of the power fibers at the node before and after straightening.
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To straighten a node I hold the bent area over a heat gun for anywhere from 30 seconds to 1 minute, until it becomes slightly pliable. I'll then clamp it into a smooth jawed vice and leave it there for a minute or so to cool.
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Below is the node after heating and pressing. The charred portion is very shallow and will be beveled off in the next step.
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The other type of bend that needs work is a side-to-side twist as shown below:
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The same node in the vice after heating:
user posted image

Chris

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#26 Carlin

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 11:36 PM

QUOTE
Is the enamel more easy to remove from the bamboo when itīs flamed, than if oven heat treated only?

I think it is about the same either way Mats. Certainly not much difference if there is any. dunno.gif

Chris

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#27 Toneloc

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 08:03 PM

Just did some catching up on this thread...Great tutorial Chris...You seriously need to write a book.

Tony

#28 Sticky

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 10:13 PM

Great stuff! This will most certainly help along my forthcoming journey!

A question about sanding, I have a 1" belt sander, are there any do nots concerning the direction of sanding? Do you have to sand along the length to avoid chipping?

#29 John DeVault

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 12:20 PM

Chris. Great job on the new tutorial. Even better and more informative than the last one. Perhaps you should start a bamboo school. John

#30 Carlin

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 08:51 PM

With the nodes straightened it is time to rough the strips. The idea here is to get the strips to a rough 60* angle, and closer to the final dimensions so as to minimize the hand planing required during finishing.

The first step is to run the strips through a beveler which, after a number of passes, gives the strips their initial angles. For each section I stop beveling when they are approximately .040" over the maximum final strip diameter for each section.
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Once beveled the strips are arranged according to the color code we set up earlier, rolled up and bound.
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The strips are now ready for heat treating.
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For heat treating flamed rods, I usually do 12 minutes in a 375* oven flipping them end to end at the 6 minute mark. This removes the remaining moisture and further tempers the cane. When the strips come out of the oven they are quite floppy due to the heat and once cooled will be fairly straight.
user posted image

Chris

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