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Bamboo Rod Do's and Don'ts


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#16 Carlin

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Posted 15 June 2005 - 06:07 PM

Alright. After fighting off the awkward feeling of wiping ferrules on my nose, I'm a believer. I have now used this 'technique' both fitting ferrules and when on the river putting rods together and it works absolutely wonderfully!

I've got to wonder who the first person to try it was, but I'm glad they did. Thanks Streamside! thumbup.gif

Chris

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#17 Streamside

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Posted 15 June 2005 - 08:47 PM

QUOTE (Carl @ Jun 15 2005, 06:07 PM)
Alright. After fighting off the awkward feeling of wiping ferrules on my nose, I'm a believer. I have now used this 'technique' both fitting ferrules and when on the river putting rods together and it works absolutely wonderfully!

I've got to wonder who the first person to try it was, but I'm glad they did. Thanks Streamside! thumbup.gif

Yep, and you'll never run out of grease either rolleyes.gif



#18 Streamside

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Posted 15 June 2005 - 08:50 PM

Here's another good tip. If you are on unfamiliar waters or terrain, it is a good idea to leave your rod in it's protective tube until you reach the waters edge or location you are going to fish. I very seldom put my rod together at my vehicle and then walk the trail to the river unless I know the area like the back of my hand. If you have to carry it to the river assembled carry it pointing backwards that way if you fall you won't break your rod. Also a cheap neoprene reel cover is an excellent investment for those expensive fly reels and reel seat hardware. Last year I fell right on a huge rock trying to make my way up a muddy embankment in felt soles after a rain. I fell right on my Lamson Lightspeed #1 attached to my favorite 3wt. I fell so hard that I literally drove the butt of my rod and reel right into the mud. Luckily I was carrying my rod backwards so it didn't get broke and had my neoprene cover over the reel and seat. I thought for sure something was bent or broke or scratched, but when I washed the mud off the reel cover there wasn't a mark on my reel or hardware.

It might be a bit of a pain carrying your tube and reel cover around with you from fishinmg hole to fishing hole, but it's better than slipping, falling on and breaking crying.gif an expensive or sentimental cane rod.

#19 Redleg

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 12:16 PM

QUOTE (Carl @ Jun 15 2005, 06:07 PM)
Alright. After fighting off the awkward feeling of wiping ferrules on my nose, I'm a believer. I have now used this 'technique' both fitting ferrules and when on the river putting rods together and it works absolutely wonderfully!

I've got to wonder who the first person to try it was, but I'm glad they did. Thanks Streamside! thumbup.gif

Yeah... and who was the first guy to cook meat? blink.gif

#20 Troutchaser

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 09:43 AM

QUOTE (Carl @ Jun 15 2005, 05:07 PM)
Alright.  After fighting off the awkward feeling of wiping ferrules on my nose, I'm a believer.  I have now used this 'technique' both fitting ferrules and when on the river putting rods together and it works absolutely wonderfully!

I've got to wonder who the first person to try it was, but I'm glad they did.  Thanks Streamside!  thumbup.gif

I tried the same thing and am sold. I will never put a rod together again without first doing this.

Little side note... When I did this for the first time a couple of weeks ago, my fishing buddy looks over just as the ferrule was beside my nose. He's says with a disgusted look on his face, and I quote "Aaaw for chr*st sakes Ron, God gave you ten fingers to choose from to do that!" lol.gif lol.gif

Catch ya..
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I fish bamboo..... For some reason it speaks to me.

#21 Carlin

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 12:22 PM

lol.gif

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#22 TODDFATHER

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 09:38 PM

I've been lubricating my ferrules with as you guys say " Nose Grease" since it was taught to me some 50 years ago. Along side of your nose or across your forhead is pretty much the same.

I was also taught if I ever encountered a rod that was hopelessly stuck togather, to place the rod behind your knees, ( while sitting down), Grasp the respective pieces of the rod with your hands tightly against the outside your legs. Grip the rod tightly, and spread your legs apart. The most stubbornly stuck rod pieces will easily come apart with no danger to the rod.



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#23 skeet3tx

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 08:02 PM

Back in the Stone Age, there was an article in an outdoor magazaine that had a tip on getting a rod apart. Put the rod behind your back. I'm predominately left-handed so this is how I do it: Have the reel end down toward the ground with your right hand on it below the ferrules with the thumb pointed toward the ground. The left hand will be pointed the same direction with your hand above the ferrules. Push with the right and pull with the left. Works great. As to nose grease, rub the rod in the crease between your nose and cheek. If you stick the rod up your nose, you shouldn't be flyfishing or driving a car. Don't worry about people staring...they probably stare as us because we use little dinky rods with little hooks and feathers that won't catch big fish. Let's keep it a secret and let them stare and wonder.
Have to add a tip for pipe smokers: My father used nose grease on the outside of the bowl of his pipe and polish it with a soft cloth.
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#24 nyflyguy

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 08:59 AM

believe it or not....I saw an article in a peer reviewed dental journal, on the use of nose grease to lubricate a rod on a precision instrument (NOT used in a person's mouth)

at first I was disgusted that such an article would even be printed....but then I thought

perhaps a book could be written....101 Uses for Nose Grease

....Ummm....did I ever tell you a good use for toe jam?.... hysterical.gif

#25 Carlin

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 11:21 AM

shocking.gif sick.gif

hysterical.gif

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#26 Troutgetter

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 08:54 AM

Well, since I'm new here, I finally got around to reading this topic. No one ever accused me of being quick (except my ex wives) unsure.gif

OK...for youse guys who didn't follow all the great advice!

How many of you carry a first-aid kit for your rod on stream?
I used to carry a small baggy in my vest with 4/0 steel wool and 2000 w/d sandpaper.
But recently, at the 2005 Colorado Rodmakers Reunion, included in the registration packet was a "Streamside First-aid Kit" that has a little bit of whatever you need to make almost any repair on stream. This little kit was put together by Darrell Groth and almost anything you need (in small quantities) to make almost any kind of temporary repair on your 'boo.
In a small zip lock baggy is a gripper pad to get a better grip to seperate a stuck rod, a small tube of super glue for to be used as glue (duhrr!) and temporary varnish, a small pad of 4/0 steel wool, a small piece of 1000 and 2000 wet dry sandpaper, a small piece of bees wax for a loose ferrule, alcohol swabs and Q-tips for cleaning ferrules, a single edge razor, and a small spool of white .004" thread.

Even if you follow all those great tips that has been listed on these pages, sometimes bad things happen, and if it happens a long way from home, at least the trip wasn't a total loss and you can get back on the stream.
Best to you,
Mike
PS...As far as I'm concerned, oil on a ferrule, nose, forehead, cheek, neck, 30wt, ANYKIND of oil, is a bad thing waiting to happen. Even if you wipe your ferrule off after applying it there is still an oily residue or it wouldn't work. ANY oil is a dirt magnet. It will scour your ferrules and produce a worn ferrule sooner than about anything I can think of! A quick swab out of the female with alcohol followed by a wipe of the male slide with 4/0 wool followed by a wipe of alcohol will, in all probability, solve your dilema. If not, a more aggressive approach with 2000 sandpaper may be warranted. My two cents!
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#27 Carlin

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 12:41 PM

Hmm. Now that is some good advice Mike! Not the nose grease part, because nose grease kicks Mooning-Smilie.gif.

Ever since my dog had a run-in with some barbed wire a few years ago and I had to give him 6 stitches using a sewing needle and Kevlar fly tying thread, I've carried a decent first aid kit for mammals - gauze, drugs, tweezers, forceps, leatherman, suture kit, duct tape, head lamp, etc. I guess now I'll have to add to that kit some of the things you suggest for rod repair. I might even toss in some of those small pouches of 5 minute epoxy for good measure.

Thanks for the tip! thumbsup.gif

QUOTE
No one ever accused me of being quick (except my ex wives)

hysterical.gif

Chris

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#28 Troutgetter

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 11:07 AM

Chris,
LMAO!
QUOTE
Not the nose grease part, because nose grease kicks (smiley didn't show) a$$.

I didn't see that smiley anywhere! I guess I should look at ALL of them!

I'll stand by the oil thing, though as a suggestion, have you tried a bar of soap?
Obviously very slippery, but completely water solulable(SP?)
It can be completely washed out after the end of the day.
Always keep your tool clean!
As an aside, I'll start another topic elsewhere...how many of youse guys find your ferrules grow overnight after fittting them to a "T" the day before?
As always, my very best to you all,
Mike
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#29 Mark Shamburg

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 11:23 AM

Chris,

Make sure to throw a tube of superglue in that first aid kit. The thin standard stuff not the gell. Superglue is sterile and does a great job of sealing a wound. It's the same stuff that Band-Aide brand sells as "Liquid Bandages."

A few years ago while camping at lake mcconaughey in nebraska, a buddy of mine slashed his foot open on a piece of sheet metal sticking up somewhere in the water. After cleaning with peroxide we sealed up the cut (which was 3 or 4 inches long and nearly 1/2 inch deep at the deepest) with superglue and it worked great. He was back on the water skis the next day and he doesn't even have a scar from it!

Mark

#30 Carlin

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 11:42 AM

QUOTE
have you tried a bar of soap?

Yes, I've washed my nose with soap before. dry.gif

j_k.gif

Nope, haven't tried soap as I don't usually have a bar on me on the river. I'll give it a try though in the interest of science. smile.gif

QUOTE
Make sure to throw a tube of superglue in that first aid kit.

For wound care I have a small bottle of the blue stuff that surgeons use. Probably just superglue with blue dye in it, but in a cooler bottle.

I will put a small tube of regular super glue in the new, expanded kit, for rod repair purposes.

Anyone know how cyanoacrylates in a tube weather freeze/thaw cycles?

Chris

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