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Terramoto

Member Since 06 Jan 2012
Offline Last Active Dec 03 2013 05:42 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Determining Rods C.W

25 November 2013 - 01:50 PM

QUOTE (Tom Kirkman @ Nov 25 2013, 10:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The CCS itself gives you relative action and power ratings. The weight or number of pennies required to obtain the required deflection for taking the action and power measurements is NOT the amount of weight the rod will cast.

The Universal Rod Rating System, derived from the the CCS, will give you lure weight casting ranges. It is more accurate than the earlier stop gap solution I gave in the chart.


then whats those formulas for? Isnt it casting lure weight range for spinning and casting rods? Because that's what it says in the CCS pdf. Where does the ERN come from? How does one calculates the ERN for example, 640 cents? I get a bit confused with this, because i dont know anything about fly rods and i keep reading the 5wt, 4wt line weights which for someone that comes from Surfcasting is non-existent.


QUOTE (fishbum @ Nov 25 2013, 10:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Does the Universal Rod Rating System use the same funny math that is shown in the above chart? If it does then it is no more useful than the CCS in my opinion.


I believe URRS is a component of CCS. Am i wrong?

In Topic: Surfcasting bamboo rods

25 November 2013 - 01:00 AM

QUOTE (Baithog @ Nov 24 2013, 12:02 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Terramoto @ Nov 22 2013, 09:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi,

Im looking into building Surfcasting and Spinning bamboo rods but i dont seem to find much about Surfcasting is the wood too weak to hold around 200gr? If there is any research where can i find it? Thank you!


Carlin posted about a bamboo surf casting rod he built that would handle up to 4oz, which I guestimate to be a little over 100gm. http://www.rodbuildi...showtopic=23765

Building the rod is not the problem. You can double or tripple build it over a core. Whether you have the strength to swing it repeatedly is another matter.


Yeah, i saw that rod and its one of the reasons i want to make a bamboo surfcasting, spinning rod. I posted there but got no answer. He said he used the taper software to make that rod, i've already download but theres something i dont understand, fly rods use line weight to measure stress curve and deflection but i dont believe Surfcasting Rods or Spinning rods that work with heavy weights will get any effect from line weight, i dont know how to complete the excel table without knowing the line weight, how can i use the software to get the stress curve for a surfcasting, spinning rod? Surfcasting rods throw from 100-250 grams, but you cast once and let it stay, spinning rods cast from 10-100grams +-. I know this is mainly a fly rod forum, but i was hoping i could get some info here as i've been getting. smile.gif

In Topic: Determining Rods C.W

25 November 2013 - 12:51 AM

QUOTE (ChrisMunn @ Nov 24 2013, 11:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
laugh.gif

AAAAHAHAHAhahahaha. I have no idea what you guys are talking about!


This is a formula to determine the Lure Weight range that a rod can cast. biggrin.gif

In Topic: Surfcasting bamboo rods

23 November 2013 - 08:29 AM

QUOTE (fishbum @ Nov 22 2013, 10:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Terramoto @ Nov 22 2013, 09:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi,

Im looking into building Surfcasting and Spinning bamboo rods but i dont seem to find much about Surfcasting is the wood too weak to hold around 200gr? If there is any research where can i find it? Thank you!


200 grains is duck soup. I fished a week ago using a 13' spey rod and casting a bit over 800 grains. 200 is very doable. That is only an 8 or 9 weight flyrod.

Jerry


Sorry for the missleading i was talking about 200 grams tongue.gif

In Topic: Determining Rods C.W

22 November 2013 - 03:58 PM

QUOTE (phg @ Nov 22 2013, 09:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The US Cent, commonly called a penny (not to be confused with the UK pence, but that's where the name came from) is manufactured to very exact standards. Hence it can be used as a weight in a balance scale, which is essentially what the Common Cents System does.

The current US Cent weighs exactly 2.5 grams.

The older (pre-1983) copper cent, which the original CCS used, weighed 3.11 grams. You can actually use either cent, as long as you don't mix them, and do the conversion based on the weight.


Ok, 1 = 3*cents, its a bit of a gamble not knowing what each number means, but its returning results.