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Turning reel seats wood types ?


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#1 Dave-G.

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 08:03 AM

So here is the deal. I've built hand made wall clock cases for years ( nice clocks, regulators and such, not craft fair stuff), never had a lathe to do spindles, finials etc. and was stuck with store bought brass items or someones stock for wood items that were hard to match my project wood with..  Now I have a lathe and my interest turns immediately to reel seats. I have in stock, cherry, maple, oak, pine. I never see that anyone turns cherry seats, is there a reason ? 

 

I'm going to be a complete newb to turning anything for a while and intend to start with a handle for a file I own that never had a handle, but that's another topic. I have no burls.



#2 Goduster

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 08:23 AM

I keep and sell both Cherry and Cherry burl in stock, works great. Although all of mine are stabilized


Ron Weber
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#3 John T.

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 08:32 AM

Pine is going to be difficult to turn as it is a soft wood.  Give it a try and make sure, no matter what wood, keep your tools sharp.


John T.

 

 

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#4 Greg LaPolla

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 08:32 AM

Dave-G,

 

I make most of my reel seats from burl.  I also have a ton of Cherry, Cocobola and Maple, however a lot of factory rods use these types of wood because they are much cheaper than burl.  

 

I would suggest you check out reelseats.com.  You will be amazed, and the quality of his burl is unmatched. 



#5 Dave-G.

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 09:33 AM

First apologies for this being in the wrapping forum and second as you guys know, I'm speaking of the inserts. And thanks for the quick responses !

#6 phg

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 05:52 PM

Really, any wood you want.  There's no significant stress on the reel seat, so weak wood is not a problem.  In addition to the above, I've used sweet gum and eastern red cedar.  Fat pen turning blanks make great reel seats. 



#7 John T.

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 05:01 AM

Soft woods would work but would dent easily.


John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.


#8 Dave-G.

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 05:52 AM

Very unlikely I would use the pine anyway. I only listed it because I have some along with the others.



#9 kbproctor

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 06:12 PM

I've turned basswood blanks and then carved wood spirits or the like into it.  After carving and doing a color wash, I seal the wood with shellac and give the insert a coat or two of thread finish.


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#10 PENZZZ

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 07:02 PM

Turning your own reel seat inserts will be fun. Following that you'll be exploring methods used to enhance and protect the beauty of the wood. Numerous options available to you there, and no single best method.

Jeff

#11 John T.

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 07:41 PM

BTW, get to know some tree services in town.  Call and see if they will be cutting any trees- maple, cherry, walnut, etc.


John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.


#12 Goduster

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 07:53 PM

And then wait a year for them to get the moisture content  to where it is acceptable, unless you have a kiln to dry them.


Ron Weber
Southwest Custom Rods

www.southwestcustomrods.com


Your Lemke reel seat dealer
http://www.southwest...l-seat-hardware

 

Authorized  Snake Brand guide dealer


#13 John T.

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 04:54 AM

If you are cutting the wood into small pieces, an old toaster oven is good or  microwave.  Keep in mind a microwave will heat up fast and can cause a fire- pulse it.

Look at www.woodturner.org for info on how to dry wood and not have to wait for months.


John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.


#14 Dave-G.

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Posted 14 April 2015 - 07:01 PM

Drying wood is one thing and not checking badly or even cracking is another. I've been around wood working for 30+ years just never had a lathe so that portion is new to me. I have oak but it's pretty planed out to size . I also have live oak in the yard, some dead some alive. I have a huge brush pile ready to be burned and it isn't all brush. i've been cutting off pipeces as experimental stock and turned some pretty nice stuff from it. Today a guy gave me a good sized chunk of dried Birch to mess around with. One thing I'm learning about wood turning is all sorts of pieces are great stock. I went down to my local fishing hole where a huge pine had come down and took a small Alder ( judging by the bark) down with it. The town went in there and chunked it all up since it was blocking the access road. I grabbed a piece of the Alder, don't need teh pine. It might be something to work with next winter.

 

Anyway cool stuff. I see me turning out candle holders long before fishing rod parts. I have a  Nova G3 chuck coming tomorrow.



#15 Gnossos

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 08:53 PM

I've always assumed that the enthusiasm for burl and exotic wood in reel seats has to do with 2 factors:

1) you don't need much wood, so exotic becomes affordable

2) you have such a small piece of wood, you really need some very busy figure to make it showy.  I love cherry, it's wonderful to turn, but, as you know, it's often pretty uniform and un-sexy, compared to amboyna, or other burls, exotics, and highly figured wood.  Among relatively common but still showy wood, buckeye burl and dyed box elder stand out, but black ash burl really lights my fire.





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