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Trim router table for reel seat mortising

router table reel seat mortising trim router

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#1 River Rat

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Posted 12 November 2015 - 07:04 PM

I've just bought a trim router to use in a dedicated reel seat mortising table/jig and wonder if anyone has a table design that they really like?  I like doing my research before I start.

 

Thanks,

Cliff


Cliff Parmer

If it's worth your time to do, it's worth doing to the best of your ability.


#2 John T.

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 09:26 AM

Go to www.routerforums.com and take your pick.  Literally hundreds of designs for router tables.


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#3 Goduster

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 10:14 AM

Biggest drawback to doing it on a router table I have found, is first speed, second you should make multiple passes so as not to have it get too aggressive. With a full depth cut on the first pass a lot of the woods like to splinter and tear out. The excess speed also cause some woods to burn when making a pass.

I tried multiple designs and procedures, and never did get any to come out with the router procedures, and finally went another direction to perfect the procedure with the amount of inserts that I do sell


Ron Weber
Southwest Custom Rods

www.southwestcustomrods.com


Your Lemke reel seat dealer
http://www.southwest...l-seat-hardware

 

Authorized  Snake Brand guide dealer


#4 John T.

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 03:27 PM

Ron uses trained termites.


John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.


#5 Dave-G.

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 06:24 AM

I saw where a guy did it on an indexing lathe, had a sliding jig along the side of the lathe for the router. So it was just part of the lathing process. Kind of like fluting on a table leg LOL !

 

I love my router table , it was purchsed from Wood Craft but I build things like crown tops for clocks etc and use the table for that. Or larger moldings for clock tops etc. As far as burning goes it helps to have a good variable speed router to negate that. Feed and speed is the factor and sharp cutters ( in general wood working I much prefer carbide blades over steel to negate or aid in less burns).



#6 Goduster

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:39 AM

I actually use a speed of 1100, and have found it works out great. I am even able to mortise the acrylic inserts now, which I have seen very little of done so far. With the router version that I tried, I also discover that grain direction and feed seemed to also come into play. While very doable, it seems to have quite a learning curve involved to achieve satisfaction.


Ron Weber
Southwest Custom Rods

www.southwestcustomrods.com


Your Lemke reel seat dealer
http://www.southwest...l-seat-hardware

 

Authorized  Snake Brand guide dealer


#7 John T.

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 05:46 PM

Ron, could we talk you into a video or picture tutorial?  I'm interested in your technique.  Should result in some great looking inserts.


John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.


#8 Goduster

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 07:37 PM

My termite's are camera shy John!


Ron Weber
Southwest Custom Rods

www.southwestcustomrods.com


Your Lemke reel seat dealer
http://www.southwest...l-seat-hardware

 

Authorized  Snake Brand guide dealer


#9 Goduster

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:16 PM

Actually it is quite simple, and adjustment are infinite, though not the most cost effective unless you are into production quantities.

First picture is of the machine

2nd pictures is of the jig built on the machine

3rd picture is of the machine ready to perform its task

 

Mill2_zpstjyaycjf.jpgMill1_zps5wjio1wy.jpgMill3_zpsjoxyllb6.jpg


Ron Weber
Southwest Custom Rods

www.southwestcustomrods.com


Your Lemke reel seat dealer
http://www.southwest...l-seat-hardware

 

Authorized  Snake Brand guide dealer


#10 John T.

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 06:50 AM

Clever!  Thanks.  That looks like a small milling machine.  Am I right?  If so, I need to tell my wife.  Will she be surprised!


John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.


#11 River Rat

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 08:13 AM

I have two router tables and a small mill (Unimat), but they all need to remain flexible for other projects which is why I asked the original question.  Since I make only a couple of rods a year, I thought a trim router set in a small dedicated table would be the simplest way to make a mortised seat.  From what I've read, and from an earlier experiment trying to use a molding router bit, I know that getting the mortise positioned on the blank is very, very delicate and thus I don't want to be doing it every time I need a seat.  A dedicated small router seems to be the solution.

 

I've made several reel seats using an eccentric jig on a lathe for the reel foot and, while I can get the reel foot to seat, the reel still seems to be able to shift laterally enough to be annoying. 

 

Cliff


Cliff Parmer

If it's worth your time to do, it's worth doing to the best of your ability.


#12 Goduster

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 09:04 AM

I was never a fan of the eccentric turned mortised, for the exact reason that you state. There is no reason that you cannot set up a dedicated table. I did not have the setup to slow the speed down, or adjust the feed was my dilemma. So being the impatient one that I am, I just looked for an alternate solution. There are a lot of individuals that are using a router and table to perform the task.

Something as simple as this, and will work with almost any standard router table.

ST_Mortise_knobs_zps0jwukglf.jpg


Ron Weber
Southwest Custom Rods

www.southwestcustomrods.com


Your Lemke reel seat dealer
http://www.southwest...l-seat-hardware

 

Authorized  Snake Brand guide dealer


#13 Dave-G.

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 04:34 PM

With a sliding jig I see no reason a table wouldn't work. In my case I have an unused Bosch portable table, for instance, that could be set up that way and never need breaking down. It could be dedicated to reel seats if I wanted that. Be ingenious, go for it !





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