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Varnish blank before wrapping?

bare or varnished blank

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#1 River Rat

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 09:16 AM

I'm finding I have trouble with my wraps showing the individual threads even though I've packed the wrap and tried to burnish it and I'm wondering if the fact that I typically put a coat of varnish (using a drain tube) on the blank before I wrap could be the culprit.  When I've finished wrapping the wrap seems to be packed tightly, but as soon as the varnish is applied the small gaps show up.  I typically use FishHawk silk thread and the tension is firm but not so much that I can't shift the guide foot a bit.  My wrapper puts tension on the spool rather than the thread and the thread only runs through a screw I before going on the blank.

 

All this leads me to wonder if the problem is that the thread is cutting into the varnish a bit even though the blank has dried at least 24 hours before I start the wraps.  Thanks for your advice.

 

Cliff


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If it's worth your time to do, it's worth doing to the best of your ability.


#2 BGreer

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 09:37 AM

Cliff,

 

I think you are correct on diagnosing your problem.

 

I don't think that the varnish has had enough time to cure. It  likely feels dry to the touch, but may not be full cured and still a little soft under the surface.

Varnish needs a while to really cure and get hard. How much, I suppose depends on the varnish you used and maybe the environment it is in while drying.

 

I'd give it several days, up to a week, before trying to wrap over it.

 

Those are my 2 cents.

 

Brian



#3 canerods

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 11:25 AM

I'm new here, in fact this my first post to this forum. I have built an sold a number of bamboo rods over the years. I have never seen a need to varnish the blanks before the wraps are done. My method is to finish the wraps and varnish them first, then dip the blanks, guides and all – taping the ferrules to keep the varnish off them of course. As to drying of varnish, if you can smell it – it's still in the process of curing. That's my method and has proven me well. Hope that helps.

Joe



#4 River Rat

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 08:25 PM

Thanks Joe, wrapping on a bare blank was my fall-back and I was wondering how that worked out.  I typically sand down to 320 grit before varnishing, is that fine enough to avoid snagging the silk?


Cliff Parmer

If it's worth your time to do, it's worth doing to the best of your ability.


#5 canerods

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 08:25 AM

As you know, anything that can grab and snag those wraps, will grab them -- especially around the guide feet if they aren't polished smooth. Polished guide feet also help the wraps snug up to each other easier. By polish I'm talking nothing more elaborate than a few passes of 0000 steel wool. On the blank itself, it wouldn't hurt to go to a 600 grit especially in the area were the guides will mount using a flat stick to keep from rounding the blank corners. I've also simply lightly burnished the flats in the area were the guides mount as well.

 

Joe



#6 graydog

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 10:14 PM

Soft varnish can trap any wrap, silk or nylon. If you can leave a dent, or mark with your fingernail, it is too soft and may need to cure another week.


Paul

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