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4' hand wrapper jig


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#1 keninnf

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 01:50 PM

ROD WRAPPING JIG

Thanks to Steelheader.net and Greg Pennell for the information used towards my wrapping jig.

After browsing through several rod building catalogs and websites, I looked at 2 foot wrapping jigs and 4 foot units as well and decided on a 4' plan. I figured out what I wanted in a rod wrapper and decided to build my own. I selected oak hardwood from my local Home Depot, but you can use poplar, pine, maple, or whatever you prefer. Total cost for my wood and the necessary hardware was a little over $40.00. If you’ve checked the prices for simple rod wrappers in some supply catalogs, you’ll see a significant savings.



Materials List:

1”x3”x48” hardwood (2 pieces)
1”x2”x 36” hardwood (1 piece)
1”x4”x48” hardwood (1 piece)
1/4”x2” bolts, with washers and wing nuts
1/4”x3” bolts, washers, and wing nuts
1 1/4” drywall screws
Wood glue
Felt
Stain and finish of choice

Step 1, The Base
From the 1x2, cut four pieces 6 3/8” long. Put remainder aside for later. take the four pieces, and glue/screw them to the bottom of the two 1x3 pieces, leaving a 5/16” gap between the two 1x3’s. Be sure to pre-drill and countersink all screw holes with a #6 pilot drill to keep from splitting the wood. Set this aside to allow the glue to dry.

Step 2, The Rod Rests
From the 1x4, cut five pieces 6” long, and four pieces 4” long. Set one of the 6” pieces aside for later. Take the four remaining 6” pieces and clamp them together. Mark and cut a “V” notch 1 1/2” deep in the one end. Then Glue/screw the uprights (6” pieces) to the 4” pieces. Drill a 5/16” hole in the center of each of the 4” bases.

Step 3, Thread Tensioner
Now, take the 6" piece you set aside earlier. For my thread holder I cut a 1x2 piece, 6" long for three 1/4" holes, so three spools of wrapping thread won’t hit each other. On mine, they are 2” apart. Glue/screw the 1x2 to top rear of the 1x4. Drill a 5/16” hole in the center of the 1x4, about 2” from the edge.
Thread the 3” bolts through the three holes in the thread base and secure them with a nut. These will hold your spools of wrapping thread. Tension on mine is supplied by three small springs. As I plan to have the thread come off on a clockwise rotation the springs and wing nuts should keep the tension I have applied earlier. I placed a small eye screw on the base to run the thread through and up to the blank.



Step 4, Finishing/Assembly
Sand lightly (if you feel ambitious, you can use a router on all the edges), stain, and apply a coat of you finish of choice. I haven't finished mine yet. Glue felt (or the fuzzy half of Velcro) to the “V” notches in the rod rests. You may want to place some on the base to keep from scratching the kitchen table, too.
Then use the 2” bolts, washers, and wing nuts to connect the rod rests and thread tensioner to the base. The slot you built into the base is for your adjustments of these three pieces.
You should have enough excess wood left to make a separate rod rest and attach a drying motor, for finishing.

#2 John T.

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 02:38 PM

Nice. The bill of materials will be most helpful to the members. Very similar to mine. Thanks for sharing. Good pix!

John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.


#3 bellybuster

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 03:41 PM

Nice job.
You can get sticky back foam sheets at wally world that you can put on the bottom to stop from scratching your table up.

#4 ray126

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 10:24 AM

On the two center supports,are the brown things magnetic tapes to hold razers?How do the uprights adjust,slide in the center groove of the base?

#5 John T.

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 01:07 PM

I use a hex nut next to the washer and use the wing nut as a jam nut to keep the fasteners from spinning off. Didn't notice the magnets. Good idea!

John T.

 

 

Marriage is like a deck of cards- in the beginning, all you need is two hearts and a diamond.  In the end, you wish you had a club and a spade.


#6 keninnf

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 09:20 AM

The dark things are magnetic strips with razors.



The uprights slide inside the 5/16" gap between the 1x2's with washers top and bottom.

On the inside of both end uprights I also drilled and placed oak doweling to act as roll stops using elastic bands. I use these when I am doing the alignment of the rod eyes.



The wrapper sits on a table that is 48" long and a glass top. If I find that anything slips when in use I will certainly be installing rubber feet.

When I was looking for wood, the oak I found was the straightest in 48" lengths. Maple was more expensive. Pine had more warpage than hoped for. Since they had all the wood parts I neededd for my material list, oak was chosen.

#7 ray126

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 10:50 AM

keninnf,
On the photos,I didn't notice the grooves going all the way threw.Being a former cabinet maker I don't know what I was thinking.My mind was trying to over think,one of those moments.Very nice job,thank you.Ray

#8 Infinity Rod Creations

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 11:16 AM

Very nice. I see the influences of Greg Pennell's rod wrapping jig throughout. http://www.rodbuildi...y/buildjig.html This is an exact version of mine with only the thread carriage arrangement being slightly different as well as my jig being 40" long.









As you pointed out, even with the more expensive woods, one can build an affordable wrapping jig in only a few hours of time. And, there is a certain satisfaction with knowing that you made it and made it exactly to your specifications and needs. My only suggestion (and I guess you'll discover whether this is a valid one as you wrap on it) would be to swap out the eyelet screw with a ceramic or coated single foot guide. This will assure you that you won't produce fuzzies and/or abuse metallic threads under tension.

I have considered switching my rod holders over to the design style linked here Blue Felt Jig (the one with the blue felt) because having them project toward the builder might be of some benefit (to me and my eyes!).

"My drifts are so distant, I dial a 1 + (area code) when setting the hook!"

Handcrafted Float, Fly, Switch and Spey Fishing Rods
http://www.infinityrodcreations.com


#9 keninnf

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 11:42 AM

QUOTE (Infinity Rod Creations @ Jan 10 2012, 11:16 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Very nice. I see the influences of Greg Pennell's rod wrapping jig throughout. http://www.rodbuildi...y/buildjig.html This is an exact version of mine with only the thread carriage arrangement being slightly different as well as my jig being 40" long.









As you pointed out, even with the more expensive woods, one can build an affordable wrapping jig in only a few hours of time. And, there is a certain satisfaction with knowing that you made it and made it exactly to your specifications and needs. My only suggestion (and I guess you'll discover whether this is a valid one as you wrap on it) would be to swap out the eyelet screw with a ceramic or coated single foot guide. This will assure you that you won't produce fuzzies and/or abuse metallic threads under tension.

I have considered switching my rod holders over to the design style linked here Blue Felt Jig (the one with the blue felt) because having them project toward the builder might be of some benefit (to me and my eyes!).



That's a great idea, using a foot guide



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