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Landing nets


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#16 madkasel

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Posted 21 February 2007 - 11:17 PM

I built this net a few years ago by bending thin strips of walnut and ash around a frame I built. I did not steam or soak any of the strips and it worked great... lots of thin strips instead of a couple thick ones. Did it all in one fell swoop... was a very harried 10 minutes of glueing and clamping and slamming them flat with a heavy mallet, you better believe!! I went to Big Lots and bought a bunch of big cheapo C clamps to accomplish the task.

Plans were from Wood Magazine. (I made the lures in the picture, too)

IPB Image


And, no, I'm not afraid to get it wet!

IPB Image


If you want more information, just shoot me a note.



#17 froggy

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 07:55 AM

madkasel,
That looks great; the net, the lures, and the fish thumbsup.gif

Let's see, building rods, started turning seat inserts, started tying flies.........start building nets? Yup, that ought to piss her off and send her over the edge..........wait a minute, I'm thinking.....


ph34r.gif whistling1.gif hysterical.gif hysterical.gif

Chris
RULE#1:If you don't take pictures, it didn't happen.


#18 morfrost

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 09:10 AM

If you are only building one net, it seems like a lot of work to make a steam box for only one net.

Make your hoop laminations from 3/16"-1/4" thick slats of ash. Use 3 laminations bent around a form. I've also done this with oak. I've made nets with 2 laminations of ash and a centre lamination of oak. I usually use ash for the handle. Some other sites can give you opinions on other woods. They may require extensive steaming, but ash and poak can be bent by a short cooking in boiling hot water ( like spaghetti).

A good source for netmaking instruction is

http://www.joelwoodw...es/page0020.htm .

There's more than enough info here for anyone. If you want to make a net in the shape of Texas, this is your site.

I would suggest that you wrap your frame slats in towelling and pour boiling water on them for and let them soak for 10 or 15 minutes. I bought some towelling ( about 6' long) from a sewing material shop. It wasn't very expensive. I bought it about 20 years ago and can'y remember the cost, and I've used it several times for netmaking and other wood bending operations.

I usually do this in my back yard. I spread a piece of plastic on the ground. Place the slats on the towel and wrap them up. I boil the water in pots on my Coleman stove then pour it on, covering the length of the strips. I then fold the plastic over the strips and towel to contain the boiling water and make a cookpot.

I have 2 pots going at all times. Check the strips after a few minutes. If the temperature has dropped to the point where you can almost handle it with bare hands, soak it again with fresh boiling water. Do this for 15 or 20 minutes. Use leather gloves to handle the wet strips and keep from scalding yourself when removing strips from your cookpot.

Have your form ready. Open up the steamed strips and take one out. It helps to have a helper the first time if you can swing it. I've always done it alone, but I gained my initial experience laminating up stems for cedar strip canoes using ripped up portions of hockey sticks. The pieces were a lot shorter and more managable.

Wrap it on your form, clamping first strip to form. Usually I do about 6 or 8 forms at a time. I will let this dry for a few days in my shed , then do the second strip clamped on the form over the first strip. Then a few days later I do the 3rd strip over the first and second. Then let the whole thing dry fcor a week or so before dissassembling for final glue up.

Laminate the 1st strip (bow) to the handle. I usually do this with West System epoxy , using their recommended procedures and thickeners to make adhesive fillers. Let this set. Usually 4-6 hours will enable you you to work on it even though its not fully cured . Sand any surfaces bare that have eopxy slopped over it where you will need to put new epoxy. I use a belt sander upside down clamped in my Workmate. Then apply 2nd bow lamination with epoxy.

Epoxy is good because it can act as a filler as well as an adhesive. Sometimes you will creat some gaps when wrapping and clamping successive bow strips over each other, since you have to unclamp them to add another srtrip. They won't necessarily reclamp in exactly the same spot on the form as they were before you unclamped them.

Repeat steps to laminate 3rd strip to the bow. Usually this will be the next day.

I usually measure and route a 1/8" groove in the centre of the 3rd strip before steaming . This is for the cord that you will use to attach the net to the bow, which will keep it recessed and protected from abrasion.

Last summer I broke my net while on a trip and replaced the bow with all 3 bow laminations of ash. This was the first net I made ( 1985). I originally made it with 2 laminations of ash and a centre lamionation of Lexan plastic ( virtually unbreakable). It looked way cool but the Lexan didn't laminate to the wood very well so I tore it apart and replaced the Lexan with oak the next winter. I was short of West System last summer so I used Gorilla glue. So far it has stood up very well. You can work the pieces after about 4 hours, and could glue up all the laminations in one day.

Good Luck. Keep us abreast of your progress.




#19 Manitoid

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 10:36 AM

QUOTE(Carlin @ Jun 15 2005, 08:25 AM) View Post


Hey, some of these links don't work!!!! :
Gerry


"Everyone ought to believe in something... I believe I'll go fishing."
- Unknown

#20 Faster Fish

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 12:02 PM

QUOTE(morfrost @ Feb 22 2007, 10:10 AM) View Post

If you are only building one net, it seems like a lot of work to make a steam box for only one net.

Make your hoop laminations from 3/16"-1/4" .......



Thanks for typing this out. Lots of good information.

Randy

#21 Faster Fish

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 12:30 PM

In exploring the above pages, I came across this http://www.joelwoodw...es/page0020.htm. All I got to say is wow.

#22 melanochromis

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 04:44 PM

I second or third the joelwoodworks site. Its the best I could find. I also second the ash for the laminations. It is incredibly strong and it bends real well. I usually use walnut as a contrast with the ash. I use the teapot/pvc for the steamer. I get my netting as well from Janns netcraft. I usually use 5 or six layers 1/16" or so each (very thin but possible on a table saw).

Timing is key for bending the wood. I use 10-15 spring clamps to clamp the wood to the form as soon as I pull the strips out of the steamer.

I use 30-40 c-clamps as well for the gluing part. and usually have no gaps. The secret with gluing is to start at the top of the net and work down to the handle. dont be skimpy with the glue. I use titebond II.

The trickiest part is routing the slot around the outside of the bow. I mounted my dremmel tool with a cutting tool with a spacer around the shaft to limit its cut to around 1/8" or so. I then mounted it to the side of my workbench so I could raise it up and down to the right height(kind of a tricky setup).IPB Image

#23 Mark Shamburg

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 07:39 PM

Melano,

Very nice work!

I've been wanting to make some nets of my own, but haven't had the time. I've got everything I need to build a steam box, and some very nice wood for the handles, now I just need time.

I found a site a while back that shows a nice little tool for cutting the groove. I'll see if I can dig it up.

What finish did you use on the net in the picture?

Mark

#24 melanochromis

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 09:31 PM

I use clear minwax poly gloss spar varnish. Seven or 8 coats with light wetsanding with 400 grit between coats. The secret is to put the last coat on very heavy on the bottom 3/4 of the net then rotate the net until the finish sets up. same idea as the rod dryer. The next day I put the final coat on the end of the hoop so the seam is barely visible. It takes a good 5 days to finish a net.

I have a local lumber and millwork shop where I buy four quarter (4/4) boards for the nets. I buy it by the 8' board for the strips and by the small chunk for the handles.

#25 madkasel

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 10:26 PM

Aha! I see this thread is back to life, and just as I'm building some nets to donate to the local TU chapter fundraiser. That jansnetcraft link will do quite nicely!

Another thing... and maybe I'm a freak... but when I finished my net (see post above) on my first and second coats I swabbed finish through the small holes by gluing a scrap of foam brush to a paperclip.

Make sure it's entirely waterproof.

#26 rovercat

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 10:50 PM

QUOTE
Let's see, building rods, started turning seat inserts, started tying flies.........start building nets? Yup, that ought to piss her off and send her over the edge..........wait a minute, I'm thinking.....


Chris
At the very least you will have some great fishing stuff.

Some place I have a easy plan for a steam tube will see if I can find it and post the directions.

#27 melanochromis

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 11:23 PM

I use a small cheap paintbrush to liberally apply finish to the holes. I then blow through the holes to remove the excess. I do this for the first couple of coats.

My steam tube is incredibly simple...A six foot long piece of 1 1/2" PVC that is duct taped to a six foot long piece of scrap wood to keep it from saggiing. Sch 40 pvc will sag pretty bad so you have to support it over 150 degrees F.

One end of the pvc is cut to a 25 degree angle or so.

I prop it up on my kitchen counter with the angled end hanging over a teapot exit spout that is on the stove. I use a section of aluminum foil that is folded several times to make a tube to connect the spout to the pvc. It leaks a little but thats not a big deal. You actually want some leakage(Trapped steam=pressure=boom). I use a wad of paper towels to partially plug the other end of the tube while steaming. Just be sure that you have a rolling cloud of steam coming out the end before you put the wood in.

The total cost of this steamer is about $4 if you use your wifes teapot. whistling1.gif It takes less than five minutes to set up and start steaming. I am sure you could use larger pvc if you would like. Its also easy to store, you just stand it upright in a closet and put the teapot back in the cupboard.

#28 rovercat

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 12:20 AM


QUOTE
I wish I had a link on bending wood with a heat gun from Rob Macks, the apsotle of the heat gun, but he has not yet put such an essay on his Laughing Loon Shop Tips page. Suffice it to say that some of the advantages of bending with a heat gun include

* not needing to set up a steamer
* bending or rebending in place
* not needing to let the part dry
* complete control of spring back

For an example of the advantages of bending in place with a heat gun, see the page below, where Rick Allnutt needed to reshape all the ribs on an SOF canoe. They had been bent with steam, but were rebent into a different shape with a heat gun while they remained on the gunwales.


I found this on another sit. May be worth a try. In rhis case it was for a canoe.

#29 melanochromis

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 12:52 AM

I would think that making bends for nets would be incredibly difficult with a heat gun. The main problem being you would have trouble getting the wood heated the same throughout its thickness.

The heat gun probably works on the gradual bends that are on a canoe but the sharp radii of the nets would be tough. It may work if you soak the wood first.





#30 rovercat

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 10:27 AM

It would more than likely be a bit difficult. Soaking the wood first is a good idea. I also thought this might get some interest in building ones on Canoe. Something I have wanted to do for a long time.

http://www.qsl.net/ws8g/canoe.htm



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