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FTOTY 2006 Bamboo Rod Build


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#16 Carlin

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 03:40 PM

The taped sections are all rolled up and ready for gluing.
user posted image

The next step is to slit the tape and unroll the sections flat onto the bench. With the enamel side down, make a few passes with a sanding block to knock down the apexes of the strips.
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With the sanding dust carefully cleaned away, its time to mix the glue. In this case I'm using URAC 185. The glue comes in 2 parts, a liquid and a catalyst. I use straight ammonium chloride in a 100/1 by weight ratio for the catalyst. Carefully weigh the two components, combine and mix thoroughly. After letting the glue set for about 10 minutes we're ready to go.
user posted image

Again, no pictures of the actual gluing process because it is so messy. sad.gif

Once each section is glued, bound and straightened, I toss it into my oven set at 225 for 10 minutes to harden and cure the glue.
user posted image

Chris

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#17 Carlin

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 03:49 PM

With the combination of URAC and cotton quilting thread, there is no way to just pull the string off of the blank, so I have to do a bit more work to remove it.

The first step is to use one of Bellinger's flat bastard files to remove the bulk of the string/glue.
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After the filing, a quick couple passes with a cabinet scraper removes most of the remaining residue.
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And finally, some touch up sanding with 320 grit sandpaper finishes the glue removal.
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Next I trim the blank to its approximate final length, clean up the edges of the cuts and do any straightening that is necessary over a heat gun set to medium.
user posted image

After the blank is cleaned and straightened I like to add a protective coat of varnish to seal and shine the blank. The varnish is simply a 50/50 mixture of spar varnish and turpentine. I pour a little on some 0000 steel wool, then firmly polish the blank, being very careful with the small ends of the tip section. A quick wipe down with a paper towel to remove any excess and the sections are set aside to cure.
user posted image

The finished blank all shined up and ready for ferrules:
user posted image

Chris

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#18 matsoberg

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 06:12 PM

Awesome, simply awesome........

#19 OSD

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 06:24 PM

Nice polish job (looks great)
Thanks for the pointers thumbsup.gif

#20 dlester

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 06:41 PM

Jeeze, you make it look so friggen easy, maybe even I could do it... hysterical.gif

Dave
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#21 Carlin

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 07:51 PM

With the blank finished it is time to move on to the ferrules.

I prefer to fit my ferrules before I mount them to the blank, that way if I screw one up I don't have to worry about trying to remove it from the blank, I just fit another, and I have also never felt comfortable with a lathe-mounted-blank spinning at high RPMs. Seems like a recipe for disaster to me. dunno.gif

Though in the past I have simply mounted the ferrule in the chuck of my lathe (with some masking tape around the ferrule of course), I recently picked up some ferruling mandrels from JD Wagner. To use them, simply slide a ferrule on to the appropriately sized mandrel, chuck it up in the lathe and fit away.
IPB Image

To fit I use sandpaper, starting with 400 grit to remove most of the material, then some touch up with 1000 grit to smooth things out and final fit, followed by polishing with 4000 grit. Once fit, I feather the tabs. I am experimenting with not crowning ferrules, so on this rod you'll notice the absence of crowns

With the ferrules fit, we move on to mounting them on the blank. First I measure the depth of the ferrule using a cutoff or other small piece of cane, and mark that depth on the blank. Before this I measured and trimmed the blank to size, compensating for the extra length the ferrule will add.
IPB Image

A few wraps of masking tape are put in place to protect the blank from the jaws of the lathe.
IPB Image

And the station is turned down to the appropriate size using 80-120 grit sandpaper.
IPB Image
IPB Image

A proper fit is one that is snug, with just the slightest hint of play so the epoxy I'll be using to glue the ferrules in the next step has some room to work.
IPB Image

Chris

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#22 Carlin

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 07:58 PM

Before mounting the ferrules, I give them a good cleaning inside and out using denatured alcohol and qTips.

With the ferrules clean, and the ferrule stations on the blank fit and cleaned up, I mix up a blob of JB Weld.
IPB Image

Using a tip from Glenn Bracket in Trout Grass, I gently heat the ferrule station over an alcohol lamp to warm it up slightly.
IPB Image

I smear on a good amount of the JB to the blank and wipe a little bit on the inside of the ferrule, and warm it up over the lamp for a few seconds. The warmed surfaces helps the epoxy flow better.
IPB Image

Its then a simple matter of pressing the ferrule into place, wiping off the excess JB and aligning the tabs.
IPB Image

A few wraps of binding thread over the tabs and up onto the blank hold the ferrules in place until the epoxy cures.
IPB Image

After the string is removed and the tabs are cleaned up with some steel wool, I double check the fit of the ferrules and make adjustments as necessary.
IPB Image

Chris

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#23 salmotrutta

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 12:30 PM

QUOTE(Carlin @ Jan 30 2007, 07:51 PM) View Post


I prefer to fit my ferrules before I mount them to the blank, that way if I screw one up I don't have to worry about trying to remove it from the blank, I just fit another, and I have also never felt comfortable with a lathe-mounted-blank spinning at high RPMs. Seems like a recipe for disaster to me. dunno.gif

Though in the past I have simply mounted the ferrule in the chuck of my lathe (with some masking tape around the ferrule of course), I recently picked up some ferruling mandrels from JD Wagner. To use them, simply slide a ferrule on to the appropriately sized mandrel, chuck it up in the lathe and fit away.



Chris,

I had a couple of questions about the mandrels:

1. How do the ferrules maintain their grip on the mandrel when you apply pressure with the sand paper? (do you apply a temporary glue in order to keep them in place?)

2. How do you periodically check for fit with the female ferrule? Do you mount the female on your blank since the female does not need to be fitted? The reason I ask is because when I constantly check for a good fit it requires quite a bit of force to slide on and off the female to the male until you get obtain that perfect fit.

Thanks
Robert


#24 Carlin

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 02:06 PM

QUOTE
1. How do the ferrules maintain their grip on the mandrel when you apply pressure with the sand paper? (do you apply a temporary glue in order to keep them in place?)

It usually just takes a friction fit. On a few of the mandrels I had to file/sand them down a tad before the ferrules would slide on. If I do have one that wants to spin, I just put a piece of tape around the tabs and that holds it down fine. Part of the trick is to hold the sandpaper gently against the ferrule without much pressure.

QUOTE
2. How do you periodically check for fit with the female ferrule? Do you mount the female on your blank since the female does not need to be fitted? The reason I ask is because when I constantly check for a good fit it requires quite a bit of force to slide on and off the female to the male until you get obtain that perfect fit.

I don't mount the female before fitting. Sometimes it does take more force than I can give bare handed to get the female off, in which case I have a couple small chunks of tire-rubber to use for grips. In most cases though, I can get it on and off by just holding the male and female and pulling. Smaller sized ferrules seem to give me more problems in this area than larger ones.

Chris

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#25 salmotrutta

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 11:51 AM

Excellent, thank you.


Robert


#26 mikko

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 09:51 AM

Was this rod never finished? huh.gif



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